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Chapter 9 - Needs of Older People in Long-Term Care Settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2021

Juanita Hoe
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Martin Orrell
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
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Summary

Rapid population aging which is the result of increasing longevity and declining fertility rates generates challenges that will require adjustments to the long-term care system. The institutionalisation rates increase dramatically with age. As little as 2% of the older population aged 65 to 74 years remains in nursing homes compared to 6% of the older population aged 75 to 84 years and 23% of those aged 85 or over.1 These trends entail significant challenges for both the health and social sectors. However, it should be highlighted that the challenge is even greater when care of the quality of services offered is taken into consideration.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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