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Chapter 29 - Visual Arts

from Part IV - Society and Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2019

Natasha Loges
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
Katy Hamilton
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
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Summary

Brahms was a man with wide cultural interests that ranged far beyond his musical practice, as evinced by his circle of friends, as well as the contents of his library. He had close relationships with several leading German artists and art historians of his time. Once he was financially stable, he accumulated a substantial collection of prints that included both modern and classical artists, focussing on German and Italian art (much like his musical interests, and in keeping with prevailing German tastes). He showed little interest in French contemporaries, despite the towering reputation of contemporary painters like Delacroix and Courbet. On a personal level, his interest in art was part of his general thirst for Bildung, or all-round cultural cultivation. Already in the late 1850s, he met Herman Grimm through Joseph Joachim. Grimm was a historian of art and literature, and his biography of Michelangelo (which Brahms owned and read) is still consulted today.

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Chapter
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Brahms in Context , pp. 286 - 295
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Botstein, L., ‘Brahms and Nineteenth-Century Painting’, 19th-Century Music 14/2 (Autumn 1990), 154–68CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brinkmann, R., ‘Zeitgenossen: Johannes Brahms und die Maler Feuerbach, Böcklin, Klinger und Menzel’, in Krummacher, F., Struck, M. et al (eds.), Johannes Brahms. Quellen – Text – Rezeption – Interpretation (Munich: Henle, 1999), 7194Google Scholar
Hofmann, K., Die Bibliothek von Johannes Brahms: Bücher- und Musikalienverzeichnis (Hamburg: Karl Dieter Wagner, 1974)Google Scholar
Malin, Y., ‘“Alte Liebe” and the Birds of Spring: Text, Music, and Image in Max Klinger’s Brahms Fantasy’, in Platt, H. and Smith, P. (eds.), Expressive Intersections in Brahms: Essays in Analysis and Meaning (Indiana University Press, 2012), 5379Google Scholar
Nelson, T., ‘Klinger’s Brahmsphatasie and the Cultural Politics of Absolute Music’, Art History 19/1 (March 1996), 2643CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papanilkolaou, E., ‘Brahms, Böcklin and the Gesang der Parzen’, Music in Art 30/1–2 (Spring–Fall 2005), 154–65Google Scholar
Vaughan, W., German Romantic Painting (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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