Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-45s75 Total loading time: 0.5 Render date: 2021-12-05T18:40:02.944Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

27 - Excitonic Superfluidity in Cu2O

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2009

E. Fortin
Affiliation:
Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada
E. Benson
Affiliation:
Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada
A. Mysyrowicz
Affiliation:
LOA, Ecole Polytechnique Palaiseau France
A. Griffin
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
D. W. Snoke
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh
S. Stringari
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi di Trento, Italy
Get access

Summary

Abstract

Using the exciton-mediated photovoltaic effect, we examine exciton transport over large distances in Cu2O as a function of temperature and particle density. Evidence for a phase transition at low temperatures and high densities is attributed to the onset of excitonic superfluidity.

We have performed exciton transport measurements over a range of temperatures and exciton densities in ultrapure, oriented large Cu2O single crystals. A sketch of the experimental method is shown in Fig. 1. The crystal is illuminated on the back surface by 10 ns pulses from a frequency-doubled YAG laser (λ = 532 nm). The initial exciton density created over an absorption depth (about one micron at λ = 532 nm) can be varied by inserting calibrated neutral density filters in the laser beam, reaching values of up to 1019 cm−3. The excitons which have migrated to the opposite face of the crystal are dissociated into free carriers by the high electric field near the Cu Schottky contact [1] deposited in a comb configuration together with an ohmic Au electrode, resulting in an external current. A time-resolved measurement of that current will give the velocity distribution of the excitons migrating through the crystal. This method of detection – as opposed to photoluminescence – is particularly well suited to the study of optically inactive paraexcitons in Cu2O; moreover, since the migration time is of the order of one microsecond as compared to the lifetime of 13 μs [2] for paraexcitons, recombination processes have little influence on the measurements.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Excitonic Superfluidity in Cu2O
    • By E. Fortin, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, E. Benson, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, A. Mysyrowicz, LOA, Ecole Polytechnique Palaiseau France
  • Edited by A. Griffin, University of Toronto, D. W. Snoke, University of Pittsburgh, S. Stringari, Università degli Studi di Trento, Italy
  • Book: Bose-Einstein Condensation
  • Online publication: 15 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511524240.029
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Excitonic Superfluidity in Cu2O
    • By E. Fortin, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, E. Benson, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, A. Mysyrowicz, LOA, Ecole Polytechnique Palaiseau France
  • Edited by A. Griffin, University of Toronto, D. W. Snoke, University of Pittsburgh, S. Stringari, Università degli Studi di Trento, Italy
  • Book: Bose-Einstein Condensation
  • Online publication: 15 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511524240.029
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Excitonic Superfluidity in Cu2O
    • By E. Fortin, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, E. Benson, Department of Physics University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON KIN 6N5 Canada, A. Mysyrowicz, LOA, Ecole Polytechnique Palaiseau France
  • Edited by A. Griffin, University of Toronto, D. W. Snoke, University of Pittsburgh, S. Stringari, Università degli Studi di Trento, Italy
  • Book: Bose-Einstein Condensation
  • Online publication: 15 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511524240.029
Available formats
×