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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2023

Andrew R. Davis
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Boston College, Massachusetts
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The Book of Amos and its Audiences
Prophecy, Poetry, and Rhetoric
, pp. 147 - 167
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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