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Part II - Familialism and Reproduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2017

Hagai Boas
Affiliation:
Tel Aviv University Center for Ethics
Yael Hashiloni-Dolev
Affiliation:
The Academic College of Tel Aviv Yaffo, School of Government and Society
Nadav Davidovitch
Affiliation:
Ben Gurion University Department of Health Systems Management
Dani Filc
Affiliation:
Ben Gurion University
Shai J. Lavi
Affiliation:
Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Bioethics and Biopolitics in Israel
Socio-legal, Political, and Empirical Analysis
, pp. 117 - 220
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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