Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-lv2sk Total loading time: 0.35 Render date: 2022-06-29T01:51:30.827Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 12 - Pigeonpea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Dominic Fuccillo
Affiliation:
University of Arkansas
Linda Sears
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Paul Stapleton
Affiliation:
International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Rome
Get access

Summary

BOTANY AND DISTRIBUTION

Pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp., belongs to the subtribe Cajaninae, tribe Phaseoloideae, subfamily Papilionoideae and family Leguminosae. It is an ancient cultivated crop with many vernacular and trade names in various languages and dialects. In India, it is called arhar and tur, in Portuguese guand and in Spanish guandu. The name pigeonpea was first reported from Barbados where the seeds were used to feed pigeons (Plukenet 1692). Van der Maesen (1986) has recorded over 300 names of pigeonpea. The important names include red gram, tur, arhar, guandul and pois d'Angole.

The plant is a perennial shrub, though in India it is usually cultivated as an annual crop. Pigeonpea has a deep root system which helps to withstand drought. The plant has a C3 pathway for carbon fixation, and interacts with cowpea strains of Rhizobium to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Most traditionally grown pigeonpeas have an indeterminate flowering habit. The inflorescences develop as axillary racemes from the branches and flowering proceeds acropetally. In the determinate types, the apical buds of the main shoots develop into inflorescences. Flowers are yellow with orange or red streaks, and the back of the corolla is fully red or orange. The flower has a typical papilionaceous structure with diadelphous (9+1) stamens, superior, subsessile or short, stalked ovary, long, filiform style with a terminal stigma. Pods are compressed, pubescent with a diagonal depression, 5-8 cm long and 1-5 cm wide. Seed number per pod varies from 2 to 9, but is usually 3 to 5.

Type
Chapter
Information
Biodiversity in Trust
Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources in CGIAR Centres
, pp. 156 - 167
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×