Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-ncgjf Total loading time: 9.715 Render date: 2022-01-19T02:51:04.783Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2015

Clark Spencer Larsen
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Bioarchaeology
Interpreting Behavior from the Human Skeleton
, pp. 433 - 592
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abbate, LM, Stevens, J, Schwartz, TA, et al. 2006. Anthropometric measures, body composition, body fat distribution, and knee osteoarthritis. Obesity 14:1274–1281.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abbott, S, Trinkaus, E, Burr, DB. 1996. Dynamic bone remodeling in later Pleistocene fossil hominids. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 99:585–601.3.0.CO;2-T>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abdushelishvili, MG. 1984. Craniometry of the Caucasus in the Feudal period. Current Anthropology 25:505–509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abram, AC, Keller, TS, Spengler, DM. 1988. The effects of simulated weightlessness on bone biomechanical and biochemical properties in the maturing rat. Journal of Biomechanics 21:755–767.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Acheson, RM. 1959. Effects of starvation, septicaemia and chronic illness on the growth cartilage plate and metaphysis of the immature rat. Journal of Anatomy 93:123–130.Google ScholarPubMed
Ackerknecht, EH. 1967. Primitive surgery. In: Brothwell, D, Sandison, AT, editors. Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas; p. 635–650.Google Scholar
Acsádi, G, Nemeskéri, J. 1970. History of the Human Life Span and Mortality. Budapest, Hungary: Akadémiai Kiadó.Google Scholar
Adachi, N, Shinoda, K-I, Umetsu, K, Matsumura, H. 2009. Mitchondrial DNA analysis of Jomon skeletons from the Funadomari site, Hokkaido, and its implications for the origins of Native American. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 138:255–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adams, P. 1969. The effect of experimental malnutrition on the development of long bones. Bibliotheca Nutritio et Dieta 13:69–73.Google ScholarPubMed
Adler, CJ, Dobney, K, Weyrich, LS, et al. 2013. Sequencing ancient calcified dental plaque shows changes in oral microbiota with dietary shifts of the Neolithic and Industrial revolutions. Nature Genetics 45:450–456.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Adler, CJ, Haak, W, Donlon, D, Cooper, A, The Geographic Consortium. 2011. Survival and recovery of DNA from ancient teeth and bones. Journal of Archaeological Science 38:956–964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agarwal, SC. 2008. Light and broken bones: examining and interpreting bone loss and osteoporosis in past populations. In: Katzenberg, MA, Saunders, SR, editors. Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton, Second Edition. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Liss; p. 387–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agarwal, SC, Beauchesne, P. 2011. It is not carved in bone: development and plasticity of the aged skeleton. In: Agarwal, SC, Glencross, BA, editors. Social Bioarchaeology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 314–334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agarwal, SC, Dumitriu, M, Tomlinson, GA, Grynpas, MD. 2004. Medieval trabecular bone architecture: the influence of age, sex, and lifestyle. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 124:33–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agarwal, SC, Glencross, B. 2011. Building a social bioarchaeology. In: Agarwal, SC, Glencross, B, editors. Social Bioarchaeology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 1–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agarwal, SC, Stout, SD, editors. 2003. Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An Anthropological Perspective. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Agnew, AM, Bolte, JH IV. 2012. Bone fracture: biomechanics and risk. In: Crowder, C, Stout, S, editors. Bone Histology: An Anthropological Perspective. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; p. 221–240.Google Scholar
Ahlborg, H, Johnell, O, Turner, C, Rannevik, G, Karlsson, MK. 2003. Bone loss and bone size after menopause. New England Journal of Medicine 349:327–334.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aikens, CM, Higuchi, T. 1982. Prehistory of Japan. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Ajwani, S, Mattila, KJ, Narhi, TO, Tilvis, RS, Ainamo, A. 2003. Oral health status, C-reactive protein and mortality – a 10 year follow-up study. Gerodontology 20:32–40.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Akins, NJ. 1986. A Biocultural Approach to Human Burials from Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. National Park Service, Reports of the Chaco Center, No. 9.
Albert, AM, Greene, DL. 1999. Bilateral asymmetry in skeletal growth and maturation as an indicator of environmental stress. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 110:341–350.3.0.CO;2-8>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Albert, AM, Ricanek, K., Patterson, E. 2007. A review of the literature on the aging adult skull and face: implications for forensic science research and applications. Forensic Science International 172:1–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alexandersen, V. 1967. The pathology of the jaws and temporomandibular joint. In: Brothwell, D, Sandison, AT, editors. Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas; p. 551–595.Google Scholar
Alexandersen, V. 1988. The late-Mesolithic dentition in southern Scandinavia. Rivista di Antropologia (Roma) 66(S):191–204.Google Scholar
Alexandre, C, Vico, L. 2011. Pathophysiology of bone loss in disuse osteoporosis. Joint Bone Spine 78:572–576.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alfonso, MP, Standen, VG, Castro, MV. 2007. The adoption of agriculture among northern Chile populations in the Azapa valley, 9000–1000 BP. In: Cohen, MN, Crane-Kramer, MM, editors. Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida; p. 113–129.Google Scholar
Alfonso-Durruty, MP. 2011. Experimental assessment of nutrition and bone growth’s velocity effects on Harris lines formation. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 145:169–180.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Allander, E. 1995. Epidemiology of osteoporosis. In: Anderson, JJB, Garner, SC, editors. Calcium and Phosphorus in Health and Disease. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; p. 355–362.Google Scholar
Allen, KD. 2010. Racial and ethnic disparities in osteoarthritis phenotypes. Current Opinion in Rheumatology 22:528–532.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Allen, T, Novak, SA, Bench, LL. 2007. Patterns of injuries: accident or abuse. Violence Against Women 13:802–816.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Allen, WH, Merbs, CF, Birkby, WH. 1985. Evidence for prehistoric scalping at Nuvakwewtaqa (Chavez Pass) and Grasshopper Ruin, Arizona. In: Merbs, CF, Miller, RJ, editors. Health and Disease in the Prehistoric Southwest. Arizona State University. Anthropological Research Papers, No. 34; p. 23–42.Google Scholar
Allison, MJ. 1984. Paleopathology in Peruvian and Chilean populations. In: Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orlando, FL: Academic Press; p. 515–529.Google Scholar
Allison, MJ, Gerszten, E, Munizaga, J, Santoro, C, Mendoza, D. 1981. Tuberculosis in Pre-Columbian Andean populations. In: Buikstra, JE, editor. Prehistoric Tuberculosis in the Americas. Center for American Archeology, Scientific Papers, No. 5; p. 49–61.Google Scholar
Allison, MJ, Mendoza, D, Pezzia, A. 1973. Documentation of a case of tuberculosis in Pre-Columbian America. American Review of Respiratory Diseases 107:985–991.Google ScholarPubMed
Al-Shammery, A, el Backly, M, Guile, EE. 1998. Permanent tooth loss among adults and children in Saudi Arabia. Community Dental Health 15:277–280.Google ScholarPubMed
Alt, KW, Benz, M, Muller, W, et al. 2013. Earliest evidence of social endogamy in the 9,000-year-old population of Basta, Jordan. PLoS ONE 8(6)e65649:1–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alt, KW, Vach, W. 1998. Kinship studies in skeletal remains – concepts and examples. In: Alt, K, Rösing, FW, Teschler-Nicola, M, editors. Dental Anthropology: Fundamentals, Limits, and Prospects. Vienna, Austria: Springer-Verlag; p. 537–554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alvarez, JO. 1995. Nutrition, tooth development, and dental caries. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 61:410S–416S.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alvarez, JO, Lewis, CA, Saman, C, et al. 1988. Chronic malnutrition, dental caries, and tooth exfoliation in Peruvian children aged 3–9 years. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 48:368–372.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alvarez, JO, Navia, JM. 1989. Nutritional status, tooth eruption, and dental caries: a review. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 49:417–426.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alvrus, A. 1999. Fracture patterns among the Nubians of Semna South, Sudanese Nubia. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 9:417–429.3.0.CO;2-4>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alzualde, A, Izagirre, N, Alonso, S, et al. 2007. Influences of the European kingdoms of Late Antiquity on the Basque Country. Current Anthropology 48:155–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH. 1987. Chemical and isotopic techniques of diet reconstruction in eastern North America. In: Keegan, WF, editor. Emergent Horticultural Economies of the Eastern Woodlands. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Occasional Paper, No. 7; p. 78–107.Google Scholar
Ambrose, SH. 1990. Preparation and characterization of bone and tooth collagen for isotopic analysis. Journal of Archaeological Science 17:431–451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH. 1993. Isotopic analysis of paleodiets: methodological and interpretive considerations. In: Sandford, MK, editor. Investigations of Ancient Human Tissue: Chemical Analyses in Anthropology. Langhorne, PA: Gordon and Breach Scientific Publishers; p. 59–130.Google Scholar
Ambrose, SH, Buikstra, J, Krueger, HW. 2003. Status and gender differences in diet at Mound 72 Cahokia, revealed by isotopic analysis of bone. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 22:217–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH, Butler, BM, Hanson, DB, Hunter-Anderson, RI, Krueger, HW. 1997. Stable isotope analysis of human diet in the Marianas Archipelago, western Pacific. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 104:343–361.3.0.CO;2-W>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ambrose, SH, DeNiro, MJ. 1986a. The isotope ecology of East African animals. Oecologia 69:396–406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH, DeNiro, MJ. 1986b. Reconstruction of African human diet using bone collagen carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Nature 319:321–324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH, Krigbaum, J. 2003. Bone chemistry and bioarchaeology. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 22:193–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH, Norr, L. 1992. On stable isotopic data and prehistoric subsistence in the Soconusco region. Current Anthropology 33:401–404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ambrose, SH, Norr, L. 1993. Isotopic composition of dietary protein and energy versus bone collagen and apatite: purified diet growth experiments. In: Lambert, JB, Grupe, G, editors. Prehistoric Human Bone: Archaeology at the Molecular Level. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag; p. 1–37.Google Scholar
Andersen, JG. 1969. Studies in Medieval diagnosis of leprosy in Denmark: an osteoarchaeological, historical and clinical study. Danish Medical Bulletin 16(S9):1–142.Google Scholar
Anderson, BG, Stevenson, PH. 1930. The occurrence of mottled enamel among the Chinese. Journal of Dental Research 10:233–238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, DD, Finnegan, M, Hottop, J, Fisher, A. 1978. The Lewis Central School site (13PW5): a resolution of ideological conflicts at an Archaic ossuary in western Iowa. Plains Anthropologist 23:193–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, DG. 1994. The Savannah River Chiefdoms: Political Change in the Late Prehistoric Southeast. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press.Google Scholar
Anderson, JAD, Duthie, JJR, Moody, BP. 1962. Social and economic effects of rheumatic diseases in a mining population. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 21:342–352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, JE. 1964. The People of Fairty. National Museum of Canada Bulletin, No. 193.
Anderson, JE. 1965. Human skeletons from Tehuacan. Science 148:496–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, JE. 1967. The human skeletons. In: Byers, DS, editor. Prehistory of the Tehuacan Valley, Volume 1. Environment and Subsistence. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press; p. 91–113.Google Scholar
Anderson, JJB. 1995. Development and maintenance of bone mass through the life cycle. In: Anderson, JJB, Garner, SC, editors. Calcium and Phosphorus in Health and Disease. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; p. 265–288.Google Scholar
Anderson, JJB, Pollitzer, WS. 1994. Ethnic and genetic differences in susceptibility to osteoporotic fractures. In: Draper, HH, editor. Advances in Nutritional Research, Volume 9. New York, NY: Plenum Press; p. 129–149.Google Scholar
Anderson, JY, Trinkaus, E. 1998. Patterns of sexual, bilateral and interpopulational variation in human neck-shaft angles. Journal of Anatomy 192:279–285.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Anderson, T. 2001. Two decapitations from Roman Towcester. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 11:400–405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andrushko, VA, Latham, KAS, Grady, DL, Pastron, AG, Walker, PL. 2005. Bioarchaeological evidence for trophy-taking in prehistoric central California. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 127:375–384.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andrushko, VA, Schwitalla, AW, Walker, PL. 2010. Trophy-taking and dismemberment as warfare strategies in prehistoric central California. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 141:83–96.Google ScholarPubMed
Andrushko, VA, Torres, EC. 2011. Skeletal evidence for warfare from the Cuzco region of Peru. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 146:361–372.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andrushko, VA, Verano, JW. 2008. Prehistoric trepanation in the Cuzco region of Peru: a view into an ancient Andean practice. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 137:4–13.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1944. Greek teeth: ancient and modern. Human Biology 16:283–297.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1947. The length of life in ancient Greece. Journal of Gerontology 2:18–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1951. Population size and microevolution in Greece. Cold Spring Harbor Symposium in Quantitative Biology 15:343–351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angel, JL. 1952. The human remains from Hotu Cave, Iran. Proceediings of the American Philosophical Society 96:258–269.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1964. The reaction area of the femoral neck. Clinical Orthopaedics 32:130–142.Google ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1966a. Porotic hyperostosis, anemias, malarias, and marshes in the prehistoric eastern Mediterranean. Science 153:760–763.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1966b. Early Skeletons from Tranquillity, California. Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, No. 2(1).
Angel, JL. 1967. Porotic hyperostosis or osteoporosis symetrica. In: Brothwell, D, Sandison, AT, editors. Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas; p. 378–389.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1968. Ecological aspects of palaeodemography. In: Brothwell, D, editor. The Skeletal Biology of Earlier Human Population. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; p. 263–271.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1969. The bases of paleodemography. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 30:427–437.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1971a. The People of Lerna: Analysis of a Prehistoric Aegean Population. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1971b. Early Neolithic skeletons from Çatal Hüyük: demography and pathology. Anatolian Studies 21:77–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angel, JL. 1972. Ecology and population in the eastern Mediterranean. World Archaeology 4:88–105.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1974. Patterns of fractures from Neolithic to modern times. Anthropologiai Közlemenyek 18:9–18.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1975. Paleoecology, paleodemography and health. In: Polgar, S, editor. Population, Ecology and Social Evolution. Aldine, IL: Chicago; p. 167–190.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1976. Colonial to modern change in the U.S.A. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 45:723–736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angel, JL. 1978a. Pelvic inlet form: a neglected index of nutritional status. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 48:378.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1978b. Porotic hyperostosis in the eastern Mediterranean. Medical College of Virginia Quarterly 14:10–16.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1979. Osteoarthritis in prehistoric Turkey and medieval Byzantium. In: Cockburn, E, Duncan, H, Riddle, JM, editors. Arthritis: Modern Concepts and Ancient Evidence. Henry Ford Hospital Medical Journal 27; p. 38–43.Google Scholar
Angel, JL. 1982. A new measure of growth efficiency: skull base height. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 58:297–305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Angel, JL. 1984. Health as a crucial factor in the changes from hunting to developed farming in the eastern Mediterranean. In: Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orlando, FL: Academic Press; p. 51–73.Google Scholar
Angel, JL, Kelley, JO, Parrington, M, Pinter, S. 1987. Life stresses of the free Black community as represented by the First African Baptist Church, Philadelphia, 1823–1841. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 74:213–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angel, JL, Olney, LM. 1981. Skull base height and pelvic inlet depth from prehistoric to modern times. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 54:197.Google Scholar
Angle, EH. 1898. Treatment of Malocclusion of the Teeth. Philadelphia, PA: S.S. White Dental Manufacturing Company.Google Scholar
Antoine, D, Hillson, S, Dean, C. 2009. The developmental clock of dental enamel: a test for the periodicity of prism cross-striations in modern humans and an evaluation of the most likely sources of error in histological studies of this kind. Journal of Anatomy 214:45–55.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Antoniades, L, MacGregor, AJ, Andrew, T, Spector, TD. 2003. Association of birth weight with osteoporosis and osteoarthritis in adult twins. Rheumatology 42:791–796.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Antunes-Ferreira, N, Matos, VMJ, Santos, AL. 2014. Leprosy in individuals unearthed near the Ermida de Santo André and leprosarium of Beja, Portugal. Anthropological Science 121:149–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apps, MVB, Hughes, TE, Townsend, GC. 2004. The effect of birthweight on tooth-size variability in twins. Twin Research 7:415–420.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arafat, A. 1974. Periodontal status during pregnancy. Journal of Periodontology 45:641–643.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arcini, C. 1999. Health and Disease in Early Lund. Lund, Sweden: Lund University Medical Faculty.Google Scholar
Arden, N, Nevitt, MC. 2006. Osteoarthritis: epidemiology. Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology 20:3–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arkush, E. 2011. Hillforts of the Ancient Andes: Colla Warfare, Society and Landscape. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arkush, E, Tung, TA. 2013. Patterns of war in the Andes from the Archaic to the Late Horizon: insights from settlement patterns and cranial trauma. Journal of Archaeological Research 21:307–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armelagos, GJ. 1969. Disease in ancient Nubia. Science 163:255–259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Armelagos, GJ. 1990. Health and disease in prehistoric populations in transition. In: Swedlund, AC, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Disease in Populations in Transition. New York, NY: Bergin and Garvey; p. 127–144.Google Scholar
Armelagos, GJ. 2000. Take two beers and call me in 1,600 years. Natural History 109:50–54.Google Scholar
Armelagos, GJ. 2003. Bioarchaeology as Anthropology. Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, No. 13; p. 27–40.
Armelagos, GJ. 2008. Devouring ourselves. In: Nichols, DL, Crown, PL, editors. Social Violence in the Prehispanic American Southwest. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press; p. 216–227.Google Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Carlson, DS, Van Gerven, DP. 1982. The theoretical foundations and development of skeletal biology. In: Spencer, F, editor. A History of American Physical Anthropology: 1930–1980. New York, NY: Academic Press; p. 305–328.Google Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Dewey, J. 1970. Evolutionary response to human infectious disease. Bioscience 20:271–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Goodman, AH, Harper, KN, Blakey, ML. 2009. Enamel hypoplasia and early mortality. Evolutionary Anthropology 18:261–271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Jacobs, KH, Martin, DL. 1981. Death and demography in prehistoric Sudanese Nubia. In: Humphreys, SC, King, H, editors. Mortality and Immortality: The Anthropology and Archaeology of Death. London, UK: Academic Press; p. 33–57.Google Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Mielke, JH, Owen, KH, Van Gerven, DP. 1972. Bone growth and development in prehistoric populations from Sudanese Nubia. Journal of Human Evolution 1:89–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Van Gerven, DP. 2003. A century of skeletal biology and paleopathology: contrasts, contradictions, and conflicts. American Anthropologist 105:53–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armelagos, GJ, Van Gerven, DP, Martin, DL, Huss-Ashmore, R. 1984. Effects of nutritional change on the skeletal biology of northeast African (Sudanese Nubia) populations. In: Clark, JD, Brandt, SA, editors. From Hunters to Farmers: The Causes and Consequences of Food Production in Africa. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press; p. 132–146.Google Scholar
Armendariz, J, Irigari, S, Etxeberria, F. 1994. New evidence of prehistoric arrow wounds in the Iberian peninsula. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 4:215–222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armstrong, E. 1984. Comment. Current Anthropology 25:318–319.Google Scholar
Arnaud, CD, Sanchez, SD. 1990. The role of calcium in osteoporosis. Annual Review of Nutrition 10:397–414.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arnold, J. 1992. Complex hunter-gatherer-fishers of prehistoric California: chiefs, specialists, and maritime adaptations of the Channel Islands. American Antiquity 57:60–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arriaza, BT. 1995. Beyond Death: The Chinchorro Mummies of Ancient Chile. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Arriaza, BT. 1997. Spondylolysis in prehistoric remains from Guam and its possible etiology. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 104:393–397.3.0.CO;2-W>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arriaza, BT, Salo, W, Aufderheide, AC, Holcomb, TA. 1995. Pre-Columbian tuberculosis in northern Chile: molecular and skeletal evidence. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 98:37–45.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Artelius, T, Svanberg, F. 2005. Dealing with the Dead: Archaeological Perspectives on Prehistoric Scandinavian Burial Ritual. Stockholm, Sweden: National Heritage Board.Google Scholar
Ashworth, A, Milner, PF, Waterlow, JC, Walker, RB. 1973. Absorption of iron from maize (Zea maize L.) and soya beans (Glycine hispida Max.) in Jamaican infants. British Journal of Nutrition 29:269–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Asingh, P, Lynnerup, P. 2007. Grauballe Man: An Iron Age Bog Body Revisited. Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University Press.Google Scholar
Atchley, WR. 1993. Genetic and developmental aspects of variability in the mammalian mandible. In: Hanken, J, Hall, BK, editors. The Skull, Volume 1. Development. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press; p. 207–247.Google Scholar
Auerbach, BM, Ruff, CB. 2006. Limb bone bilateral asymmetry: variability and commonality among modern humans. Journal of Human Evolution 50:203–218.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aufderheide, AC. 1989. Chemical analysis of skeletal remains. In: İşcan, MY, Kennedy, KAR, editors. Reconstruction of Life from the Skeleton. New York, NY: Alan R. Liss; p. 237–260.Google Scholar
Aufderheide, AC. 2003. The Scientific Study of Mummies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Aufderheide, AC, Angel, JL, Kelley, JO, et al. 1985. Lead in bone. III. Prediction of social correlates from skeletal lead content in four Colonial American populations (Catoctin Furnace, College Landing, Governor’s Land, and Irene Mound). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 66:353–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aufderheide, AC, Neiman, FD, Wittmers, LE., Rapp, G. 1981. Skeletal lead content as an indicator of lifetime lead ingestion and the social correlates in an archaeological population. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 55:285–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aufderheide, AC, Rodríguez-Martín, C, editors. 1998. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Paleopathology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Aufderheide, AC, Tieszen, LL, Alison, MJ, Wallgren, J, Rapp, GJ. 1988. Chemical reconstruction of components in complex diets: a pilot study. In: Kennedy, BV, LeMoine, GM, editors. Diet and Subsistence: Current Archaeological Perspectives. Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary, Proceedings of the 19th Annual Chacmool Conference; p. 301–306.Google Scholar
Aufderheide, AC, Wittmers, LE., Rapp, G, Wallgren, J. 1988. Anthropological applications of skeletal lead analysis. American Anthropologist 90:931–936.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Austin, C, Smith, TM, Bradman, A, et al. 2013. Barium distributions in teeth reveal early-life dietary transitions in primates. Nature 498:216–219.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Avis, V. 1959. The relation of the temporal muscle to the form of the coronoid process. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 17:99–104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Avis, V. 1961. The significance of the angle of the mandible: an experimental and comparative study. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 19:55–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baer, MJ. 1956. Dimensional changes in the human head and face in the third decade of life. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 14:557–575.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bailey, SM, Gershoff, SN, McGandy, RB, et al. 1984. A longitudinal study of growth and maturation in rural Thailand. Human Biology 56:539–557.Google ScholarPubMed
Bailit, HL, Niswander, JD, MacLean, CJ. 1968. The relationship among several prenatal factors and variation in the permanent dentition in Japanese children. Growth 32:331–345.Google ScholarPubMed
Bailit, HL, Workman, PL, Niswander, JD, MacLean, CJ. 1970. Dental asymmetry as an indicator of genetic and environmental conditions in human populations. Human Biology 42:626–638.Google ScholarPubMed
Baker, BJ. 1997. Contributions of biological anthropology to the understanding of ancient Nubians and Nubian societies. In: Lustig J, editor. Anthropology and Egyptology: A Developing Dialogue. Monographs in Mediterranean Archaeology 8; p. 106–116.
Baker, BJ, Armelagos, GJ. 1988. The origin and antiquity of syphilis: paleopathological diagnosis and interpretation. Current Anthropology 29:703–737.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, BJ, Dupras, TL, Tocheri, MW, Wheeler, SM. 2005. The Osteology of Infants and Children. College Station, TX: Texas A & M University Press.Google Scholar
Bales, CW, Anderson, JJB. 1995. Influence of nutritional factors on bone health of the elderly. In: Anderson, JJB, Garner, SC, editors. Calcium and Phosphorus in Health and Disease. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; p. 319–337.Google Scholar
Bamforth, DB. 1994. Indigenous people, indigenous violence: precontact warfare on the North American Great Plains. Man 29:95–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbujani, G, Bertorelle, G, Chikhi, L. 1998. Evidence for Paleolithic and Neolithic gene flow in Europe. American Journal of Human Genetics 62:488–492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbujani, G, Sokal, RR. 1990. Zones of sharp genetic change in Europe are also linguistic boundaries. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 87:1816–1819.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barker, DJP. 2001. Fetal Origins of Cardiovascular and Lung Disease. Oxford, UK: Taylor & Francis Books.Google Scholar
Barker, DJP. 2012. Developmental origins of chronic disease. Public Health 126:185–189.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barker, DJP, Eriksson, JG, Forsen, T, Osmond, C. 2002. Fetal origins of adult disease: strength of effects and biological basis. International Journal of Epidemiology 31:1235–1239.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barmes, DE. 1962. Dental Disease Patterns Related to Dietary Patterns in Primitive Peoples of the Territory of Papua and New Guinea. DDS Dissertation, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.Google Scholar
Barmes, DE. 1977. Epidemiology of dental diseases. Journal of Clinical Periodontology 4:80–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barnes, I, Thomas, MG. 2006. Evaluating bacterial pathogen DNA preservation in museum osteological collections. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 273:645–653.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baron, I, Hummel, S, Herrmann, B. 1996. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in ancient human bones. Journal of Archaeological Science 23:667–671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barondess, DA, Sauer, NJ. 1985. Human skeletal remains from 20IS46: a Late Archaic burial locale in eastern Michigan. Michigan Archaeologist 31:82–96.Google Scholar
Barrett, AR, Blakey, ML. 2011. Life histories of enslaved Africans in colonial New York: a bioarchaeological study of the New York African Burial Ground. In: Agarwal, SC, Glencross, BA, editors. Social Bioarchaeology. New York, NY: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 214–253.Google Scholar
Barrett, CK, Guatelli-Steinberg, D, Sciulli, PW. 2012. Revisiting dental fluctuating asymmetry in Neandertals and modern humans. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 149:193–204.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barrett, MJ, Brown, T. 1966. Eruption of deciduous teeth in Australian Aborigines. Australian Dental Journal 11:43–50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bartelink, EJ, Andrushko, VA, Bellifemine, VI, Nechayev, I, Jurmain, R. 2014. Violence and warfare in the prehistoric San Francisco Bay area: regional and temporal variation in conflict. In: Knüsel, C, Smith, MJ, editors. The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict. London, UK: Routledge; p. 285–307.Google Scholar
Barton, L, Newsome, SD, Chen, F-H, et al. 2009. Agricultural origins and the isotopic identity of domestication in northern China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106:5523–5528.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bartsiokas, A, Day, MH. 1993. Lead poisoning and dental caries in the Broken Hill hominid. Journal of Human Evolution 24:243–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bass, SL, Saxon, L, Daly, RM, et al. 2002. The effect of mechanical loading on the size and shape of bone in pre-, peri-, and postpubertal girls: a study in tennis players. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 17:2274–2280.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bass, WM. 1964. The Variation in Physical Types of the Prehistoric Plains Indians. Plains Anthropologist Memoir, No. 1.
Bass, WM. 2005. Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual of the Human Skeleton, Fifth Edition. Columbia, MO: Missouri Archaeological Society.Google Scholar
Basset, A, Malgras, J, Maleville, J. 1994. Aspects des tréponématoses endémiques non vénériennes en Afrique de l’ouest. In: Dutour, O, Pálfi, G, Bérato, J, Brun, JP, editors. L’Origine de la Syphilis en Europe: Avant ou Après 1493?Paris, France: Éditions Errance; p. 55–56.Google Scholar
Bassett, EJ. 1981. Tetracycline staining in a pre-antibiotic population from Sudanese Nubia. Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société‚ d’Anthropologie de Paris 8:321–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bassett, EJ. 1982. Osteological analysis of Carrier Mills burials. In: Jefferies, RW, Butler, B, editors. The Carrier Mills Archaeological Project: Human Adaptation in the Saline Valley, Illinois, Volume II. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Research Paper, No. 33; p. 1027–1114.Google Scholar
Bassett, EJ, Keith, MS, Armelagos, GJ, Martin, DL. 1980. Tetracycline-labeled human bone from ancient Sudanese Nubia (A.D. 350). Science 209:1532–1534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Basu, MK, Dutta, AN. 1963. Report on “prevalence of periodontal disease in the adult population in Calcutta,” by Ramfjord’s technique. Journal of the All India Dental Association 35:187.Google Scholar
Batrawi, AM. 1946. The racial history of Egypt and Nubia, Part II. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 76:132–156.Google Scholar
Baume, LJ, Meyer, J. 1966. Dental dysplasia related to malnutrition, with special reference to melanodontia and odontoclasia. Journal of Dental Research 45:726–741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baynes, RD, Bothwell, TH. 1990. Iron deficiency. Annual Review of Nutrition 10:133–148.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beals, KL. 1972. Head form and climatic stress. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 37:85–92.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beals, KL, Smith, CL, Dodd, SM. 1984. Brain size, cranial morphology, climate, and time machines. Current Anthropology 25:301–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, LA, editor. 1995. Regional Approaches to Mortuary Analysis. New York, NY: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, TJ, Ruff, CB, Warden, KE, Scott, WW., Rao, GU. 1990. Predicting femoral neck strength from bone mineral data: a structural approach. Investigative Radiology 25:6–18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Becker, MJ. 1993. Human skeletons from Tarquinia: a preliminary analysis of the 1989 Cimitero site excavations with inferences for the evaluation of Etruscan social classes. Studi Etruschi 58(3):211–248.Google Scholar
Becker, NSA, Verdu, P, Froment, A, et al. 2011. Indirect evidence for the genetic determination of short stature in African Pygmies. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 145:390–401.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beecher, RM, Corruccini, RS. 1981. Effects of dietary consistency on maxillary arch breadth in macaques. Journal of Dental Research 60:68.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beecher, RM, Corruccini, RS. 1983. Craniofacial correlates of dietary consistency in a nonhuman primate. Journal of Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology 3:193–202.Google Scholar
Begg, PR. 1954. Stone age man’s dentition. American Journal of Orthodontics 40:298–312, 373–383, 462–475, 517–531.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Behrend, GA. 1978. The epidemiology of dental caries and subsistence pattern change. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 48:380.Google Scholar
Behrents, RG. 1985. Growth in the Aging Craniofacial Skeleton. University of Michigan Center for Human Growth and Development, Craniofacial Growth Series Monograph, No. 17.Google Scholar
Belcastro, MG, Mariotti, V, Facchini, F, Dutour, O. 2005. Leprosy in a skeleton from the 7th century necropolis of Vicenne-Campochiaro (Molise, Italy). International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 15:431–448.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bellantoni, NF, Sledzik, PS, Poirier, DA. 1997. Rescue, research, and reburial: Walton family cemetery, Griswold, Connecticut. In: Poirier, DA, Bellantoni, NF, editors. In Remembrance: Archaeology and Death. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey; p. 131–154.Google Scholar
Bello, SM, Thomann, A, Signoli, M, Dutour, O, Andrews, P. 2006. Age and sex bias in the reconstruction of past population structures. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 129:24–38.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bellwood, P. 2001. Early agriculturalist population diasporas? Farming, languages, and genes. Annual Review of Anthropology 30:181–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beltrán-Sánchez, H, Crimmins, EM, Finch, CE. 2012. Early cohort mortality predicts the rate of aging in the cohort: a historical analysis. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 3:380–386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bement, LC. 1994. Hunter-Gatherer Mortuary Practices during the Central Texas Archaic. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Ben-David, Y, Hershkovitz, I, Rubin, D, Moscona, D, Ring, B. 1992. Inbreeding effects on tooth size, eruption age and dental directional and fluctuating asymmetry among South Sinai Bedouins. In: Smith, P, Tchernov, E, editors. Structure, Function and Evolution of Teeth. London, UK: Freund; p. 361–389.Google Scholar
Bender, MM, Baerreis, DA, Steventon, RL. 1981. Further light on carbon isotopes and Hopewell agriculture. American Antiquity 46:346–353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benfer, RA. 1984. The challenges and rewards of sedentism: the preceramic village of Paloma, Peru. In: Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orland, FL: Academic Press; p. 531–558.Google Scholar
Benfer, RA, Edwards, DS. 1991. The principal axis method for measuring rate and amount of dental attrition: estimating juvenile or adult tooth wear from unaged adult teeth. In: Kelley, MA, Larsen, CS, editors. Advances in Dental Anthropology. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 325–340.Google Scholar
Ben-Itzhak, S, Smith, P, Bloom, RA. 1988. Radiographic study of the humerus in Neandertals and Homo sapiens sapiens. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 77:231–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benjamin, M, Toumi, H, Ralphs, JR, et al. 2006. Where tendons and ligaments meet bone: attachment sites (‘entheses’) in relation to exercise and/or mechanical load. Journal of Anatomy 208:471–490.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bennett, KA. 1973. The Indians of Point of Pines, Arizona: A Comparative Study of their Physical Characteristics. Anthropological Papers of the University of Arizona, No. 23.Google Scholar
Bennett, KA, Cheverud, JM, Booth, SN. 1981. Deciduous tooth dimension in fetal rhesus monkeys from mothers with induced diabetes. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 55:411–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bennike, P. 1985. Palaeopathology of Danish Skeletons: A Comparative Study of Demography, Disease and Injury. Copenhagen, Denmark: Akademisk Forlag.Google Scholar
Bennike, P. 1991a. Epidemiological aspects of paleopathology in Denmark: past, present, and future studies. In: Ortner, DJ, Aufderheide, AC, editors. Human Paleopathology: Current Syntheses and Future Options. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 140–144.Google Scholar
Bennike, P. 1991b. Palaeopathological studies of the prehistoric and early historic population from Denmark. Veroff sbersee-Mus 9:129–146.Google Scholar
Bennike, P. 1999. Facts or myths? A re-evaluation of cases of diagnosed tuberculosis in Denmark. In: Pálfi, G, Dutour, O, Deak, J, Hutas, I, editors. Tuberculosis: Past and Present. Budapest/Szeged, Hungary: Golden Book Publishers and Tuberculosis Foundation; p. 511–518.Google Scholar
Bennike, P. 2002. Vilhelm Møller-Christensen: his work and legacy. In: Roberts, CA, Lewis, ME, Manchester, K, editors. The Past and Present of Leprosy: Archaeological, Historical, Palaeopathological and Clinical Approaches. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 1054; p. 135–144.Google Scholar
Bennike, P, Alexandersen, V. 2007. Population plasticity in southern Scandinavia: from oysters and fish to gruel and meat. In: Cohen, MN, Crane-Kramer, GMM, editors. Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida; p. 130–148.Google Scholar
Bennike, P, Ebbesen, K, Jorgensen, LB. 1986. The bog find from Sigersdal. Journal of Danish Archaeology 5:85–115.Google Scholar
Benson, EP, Boone, EP, editors. 1984. Ritual Human Sacrifice in Mesoamerica. Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks.Google Scholar
Bentley, GR. 1991. A bioarchaeological reconstruction of the social and kinship systems at Early Bronze Age Bab edh-Dhra’, Jordan. In: Gregg, SA, editor. Between Bands and States. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Occasional Paper, No. 9; p. 5–34.Google Scholar
Bentley, GR, Jasinska, G, Goldberg, T. 1993. Is the fertility of agriculturalists higher than that of nonagriculturalists?Current Anthropology 34:778–785.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bentley, RA. 2006. Strontium isotopes from the earth to the archaeological skeleton: a review. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 13:135–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bentley, RA, Pietrusewsky, M, Douglas, MT, Atkinson, TC. 2005. Matrilocality during the prehistoric transition to agriculture in Thailand?Antiquity 79:865–881.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bentley, RA, Price, TD, Luning, J, et al. 2002. Human migration in early Neolithic Europe. Current Anthropology 43:799–804.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berger, TD, Trinkaus, E. 1995. Patterns of trauma among the Neandertals. Journal of Archaeological Science 22:841–852.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bermúdez de Castro, JM, Bromage, TG, Fernández Jalvo, Y. 1988. Buccal striations on fossil human anterior teeth: evidence of handedness in the middle and early Upper Pleistocene. Journal of Human Evolution 17:403–412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bermúdez de Castro, JM, Nicolas, ME. 1995. Posterior dental size reduction in hominids: the Atapuerca evidence. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 96:335–356.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bermúdez de Castro, JM, Pérez, PJ. 1995. Enamel hypoplasia in the Middle Pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 96:301–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berndt, CH. 1978. In Aboriginal Australia. In: Montagu, A, editor. Learning Non-Aggression: The Experience of Non-Literate Societies. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; p. 144–160.Google Scholar
Berney, S, Goldstein, M, Bishko, F. 1972. Clinical and diagnostic features of tuberculous arthritis. American Journal of Medicine 53:36–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berry, AC, Berry, RJ. 1967. Epigenetic variation in the human cranium. Journal of Anatomy 101:361–379.Google Scholar
Berry, AC, Berry, RJ. 1972. Origins and relationships of the ancient Egyptians, based on a study of non-metrical variations in the skull. Journal of Human Evolution 1:199–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhargava, A. 1999. Modeling the effects of nutritional and socioeconomic factors on the growth and morbidity of Kenya school children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 11:317–326.Google Scholar
Bianucci, R, Rahalison, L, Massa, ER, et al. 2008. A rapid diagnostic test detects plague in ancient human remains: an example of the interaction between archeological and biological approaches (southeastern France, 16th–18th century). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 136:361–367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bianucci, R, Rahalison, L, Peluso, A, et al. 2009. Plague immunodetection in remains of religious exhumed from burial sites in France. Journal of Archaeological Science 36:616–621.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bielicki, T, Welon, Z. 1982. Growth data as indicators of social inequalities: the case of Poland. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 25:153–167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biggerstaff, RH. 1970. Morphological variation for the permanent mandibular first molars in human monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Archives of Oral Biology 15:721–733.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biknevicius, AR, Ruff, CB. 1992. Use of biplanar radiographs for estimating cross-sectional geometric properties of mandibles. Anatomical Record 232:157–163.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Billman, BR. 2008. An outbreak of violence and raiding in the central Mesa Verde region in the 12th century AD. In: Nichols, DL, Crown, PL, editors. Social Violence in the Prehispanic American Southwest. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press; p. 41–69.Google Scholar
Billman, BR, Lambert, PM, Leonard, BL. 2000. Cannibalism, warfare, and drought in the Mesa Verde region during the twelfth century A.D. American Antiquity 65:145–178.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bird, HA, Eastmond, CJ, Hudson, A, Wright, V. 1980. Is generalized joint laxity a factor in spondylolisthesis?Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 9:203–205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Birkby, WH. 1982. Biosocial interpretations from cranial nonmetric traits of Grasshopper Pueblo skeletal remains. In: Longacre, WA, Holbrook, SJ, Graves, MW, editors. Multidisciplinary Research at Grasshopper Pueblo, Arizona. Anthropological Papers of the University of Arizona, No. 40; p. 36–41.Google Scholar
Black, TK. 1980. An exception to the apparent relationships between stress and fluctuating dental asymmetry. Journal of Dental Research 59:1168–1169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blackburn, A. 2011. Bilateral asymmetry of the humerus during growth and development. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 145:639–646.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blair, EH. 2013. The Guale landscape of Santa Catalina de Guale: 30 years of geophysics at a Spanish colonial mission. In: Thompson, VD, Thomas, DH, editors. Life among the Tides: Recent Archaeology on the Georgia Bight. Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, No. 98; p. 375–393.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL. 1971. Comparison of the mortality profiles of Archaic, Middle Woodland, and Middle Mississippian skeletal populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 34:43–54.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blakely, RL. 1977. Sociocultural implications of demographic data from Etowah, Georgia. In: Blakely, RL, editor. Biocultural Adaptation in Prehistoric America. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press; p. 45–66.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL. 1980. Sociocultural implications of pathology between the village area and Mound C skeletal remains from Etowah, Georgia. In: Willey, P, Smith, PH, editors. The Skeletal Biology of Aboriginal Populations in the Southeastern United States. Tennessee Anthropological Association, Miscellaneous Paper, No. 5; p. 28–38.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL. 1988. The life cycle and social organization. In: Blakely, RL, editor. The King Site: Continuity and Contact in Sixteenth-Century Georgia. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press; p. 17–34.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL. 1989. Bone strontium in pregnant and lactating females from archaeological samples. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 80:173–186.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blakely, RL. 1995. Social organization at Etowah: a reconsideration of paleodemographic and paleonutritional evidence. Southeastern Archaeology 14:46–59.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL, Beck, LA. 1981. Trace elements, nutritional status, and social stratification at Etowah, Georgia. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 376:417–431.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blakely, RL, Beck, L. 1984. Tooth-tool use versus dental mutilation: a case study from the prehistoric Southeast. Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology 9:269–277.Google Scholar
Blakely, RL, Mathews, DS. 1990. Bioarchaeological evidence for a Spanish – Native American conflict in the sixteenth-century Southeast. American Antiquity 55:718–744.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blakeslee, DJ. 1994. The archaeological context of human skeletons in the Northern and Central Plains. In: Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL, editors. Skeletal Biology in the Great Plains: Migration, Warfare, Health, and Subsistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 9–32.Google Scholar
Blakey, ML. 2001. Bioarchaeology of the African diaspora in the Americas: its origins and scope. Annual Review of Anthropology 30:387–422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blakey, ML. 2010. African Burial Ground Project: paradigm for cooperation?Museum International 62:61–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blakey, ML, Armelagos, GJ. 1985. Deciduous dental enamel defects in prehistoric Americans from Dickson Mounds: prenatal and postnatal stress. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 66:371–380.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blakey, M, Leslie, TE, Reidy, JP. 1994. Frequency and chronological distribution of dental enamel hypoplasia in enslaved African Americans: a test of the weaning hypothesis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 95:371–383.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blanco, RA, Acheson, RM, Canosa, C, Salomon, JB. 1974. Height, weight, and lines of arrested growth in young Guatemalan children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 40:39–48.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blanton, RE. 1978. Monte Albán: Settlement Patterns at the Ancient Zapotec Capital. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Blanton, RE. 1981. The rise of cities. In: Sabloff, JA, editor. Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press; p. 392–400.Google Scholar
Blatt, SH. 2013. From the Mouth of Babes: Reconstructing Dental Age and Growth of Prehistoric Native American Juveniles Using Incremental Microstructures of Enamel. PhD Dissertation, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.Google Scholar
Blau, S. 2007. Skeletal and dental health and subsistence change in the United Arab Emirates. In: Cohen, MN, Crane-Kramer, GMM, editors. Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida; p. 190–206.Google Scholar
Blau, S, Yagodin, V. 2005. Osteoarchaeological evidence for leprosy from western central Asia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 126:150–158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blinkhorn, AS, Davies, RM. 1996. Caries prevention: a continued need worldwide. International Dental Journal 46:119–125.Google ScholarPubMed
Blitz, JH. 1988. Adoption of the bow in prehistoric North America. North American Archaeologist 9:123–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Block, JA, Shakoor, N. 2010. Lower limb osteoarthritis: biomechanical alterations and implications for therapy. Current Opinion in Rheumatology 22:544–550.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blom, DE, Buikstra, JE, Keng, L, et al. 2005. Anemia and childhood mortality: latitudinal patterning along the coast of pre-Columbian Peru. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 127:152–169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blom, DE, Janusek, JW, Buikstra, JE. 2003. A reevaluation of the human remains from Tiwanaku. In: Kolata, A, editor. Tiwanaku and Its Hinterland: Archaeological and Paleoecological Investigations of an Andean Civilization, Volume 2. Urban and Rural Archaeology. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 435–448.Google Scholar
Blondiaux, J, Durr, J, Khouchaf, L, Eisenberg, LE. 2002. Microscopic study and x-ray analysis of two 5th century cases of leprosy: palaeoepidemiological and clinical approaches. In: Robert, CA, Lewis, ME, Manchester, K, editors. The Past and Present of Leprosy: Archaeological, Historical, Palaeopathological and Clinical Approaches. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 1054; p. 105–110.Google Scholar
Blondiaux, J, Duvette, J-F, Eisenberg, LE. 1994. Microradiographs of leprosy from an osteoarchaeological context. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 4:13–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blondiaux, J, Hedain, P, Chastanet, M, et al. 1999. Epidemiology of tuberculosis: a 4th to 12th c. AD picture in a 2498-skeleton series from northern France. In: Pálfi, G, Dutour, O, Deak, J, Hutas, I, editors. Tuberculosis: Past and Present. Budapest/Szeged, Hungary: Golden Book Publishers and Tuberculosis Foundation; p. 521–530.Google Scholar
Bloom, AI, Bloom, RA, Kahila, G, Eisenberg, E, Smith, P. 1995. Amputation of the hand in the 3600-year-old skeletal remains of an adult male: the first case reported from Israel. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 5:188–191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boas, F. 1902. Rudolf Virchow’s anthropological work. Science 16:441–445.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boas, F. 1912. Changes in bodily form of descendants of immigrants. American Anthropologist 14:530–563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boas, F. 1916. New evidence in regard to the instability of human types. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2:713–718.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bocquentin, F. 2007. A Final Natufian population: health and burial status at Eynan-Mallaha. In: Faerman, M, Horwitz, LK, Kahana, T, Zilberman, U, editors. Faces from the Past: Diachronic Patterns in the Biology of Human Populations from the Eastern Mediterranean: Papers in Honour of Patricia Smith. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 1603; p. 67–81.Google Scholar
Bocquet-Appel, J-P. 2002. Paleoanthropological traces of Neolithic demographic transition. Current Anthropology 43:637–650.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bocquet-Appel, J-P, editor. 2008. Recent Advances in Paleodemography: Data, Techniques, Patterns. Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer.CrossRef
Bocquet-Appel, J-P. 2011. When the world’s population took off: the springboard of the Neolithic Demographic Transition. Science 333:560–561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bocquet-Appel, J-P, Bar-Yosef, O, editors. 2008. The Neolithic Demographic Transition and its Consequences. New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bocquet-Appel, J-P, Masset, C. 1982. Farewell to paleodemography. Journal of Human Evolution 11:321–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bocquet-Appel, J-P, Naji, S. 2006. Testing the hypothesis of a worldwide Neolithic demographic transition: corroboration from American cemeteries. Current Anthropology 47:341–365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bocquet-Appel, J-P, Naji, S, Bandy, M. 2008. Demographic and health changes during the transition to agriculture in North America. In: Bocquet-Appel, J-P, editor. Recent Advances in Paleodemography: Data, Techniques, Patterns. Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer; p. 277–292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bogaard, A, Fraser, R, Heaton, THE, et al. 2013. Crop manuring and intensive land management by Europe’s first farmers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110:12589–12594.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bogdan, G, Weaver, DS. 1992. Pre-Columbian treponematosis in coastal North Carolina. In: Verano, JW, Ubelaker, DH, editors. Disease and Demography in the Americas. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 155–163.Google Scholar
Bogin, B, Keep, R. 1999. Eight thousand years of economic and political history in Latin America revealed by anthropometry. Annals of Human Biology 26:333–351.Google ScholarPubMed
Bogin, BA. 1999. Patterns of Human Growth, Second Edition. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Bogin, BA, Loucky, J. 1997. Plasticity, political economy, and physical growth status of Guatemala Maya children living in the United States. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 102:17–32.3.0.CO;2-A>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bogin, BA, MacVean, RB. 1978. Growth in height and weight of urban Guatemalan primary school children of low and high socioeconomic class. Human Biology 50:477–487.Google ScholarPubMed
Bogin, BA, MacVean, RB. 1981. Nutritional and biological determinants of body fat patterning in urban Guatemalan children. Human Biology 53:259–268.Google ScholarPubMed
Bogin, BA, MacVean, RB. 1983. The relationship of socioeconomic status and sex to body size, skeletal maturation, and cognitive status of Guatemala City schoolchildren. Child Development 54:115–128.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boklage, CE. 1987. Developmental differences between singletons and twins in distributions of dental diameter asymmetries. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 74:319–331.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boldsen, JL. 1995. The place of plasticity in the study of the secular trend for male stature: an analysis of Danish biological population history. In: Mascie-Taylor, CGN, Bogin, B, editors. Human Variability and Plasticity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 75–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boldsen, JL. 2005. Leprosy and mortality in the Medieval Danish village of Tirup. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 126:159–168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boldsen, JL. 2007. Early childhood stress and adult age mortality: A study of dental enamel hypoplasia in the medieval village of Tirup. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 132:59–66.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boldsen, JL. 2008. Leprosy in the early Medieval Lauchheim community. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 135:301–310.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boldsen, JL, Milner, GR. 2012. An epidemiological approach to paleopathology. In: Grauer, A, editor. A Companion to Paleopathology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 114–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boldsen, JL, Milner, GR, Konigsberg, LW, Wood, JW. 2002. Transition analysis: a new method for estimating age from skeletons. In: Hoppa, RD, Vaupel, JW, editors. Paleodemography: Age Distributions from Skeletal Samples. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 73–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boldsen, JL, Mollerup, L. 2006. Outside St. Jorgen: leprosy in the Medieval Danish city of Odense. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 130:344–351.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bolnick, DA, Smith, DG. 2007. Migration and social structure among the Hopewell: evidence from ancient DNA. American Antiquity 72:627–644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bolton, HE. 1927. Fray Juan Crespí, Missionary Explorer on the Pacific Coast, 1769–1774. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Bonassie, P. 1989. Consommation d’aliments immondes et cannibalisme de–survie dans l’occident du haut moyen âge. Annales ESC 5:1035–1056.Google Scholar
Bonatto, SL, Salzano, FM. 1997. A single and early migration for the peopling of the Americas supported by mitochondrial DNA sequence data. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 94:1866–1871.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bonfiglioli, B, Mariotti, V, Facchini, F, Belcastro, MG. 2004. Masticatory and non-masticatory dental modifications in the Epipalaeolithic necropolis of Taforalt (Morocco). International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 14:448–456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bonsall, C, Cook, GT, Hedges, REM, et al. 2004. Radiocarbon and stable isotope evidence of dietary change from the Mesolithic to the Middle Ages in the Iron Gates: new results from Lepenski Vir. Radiocarbon 46:293–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boocock, P, Roberts, C, Manchester, K. 1995. Maxillary sinusitis in Medieval Chichester, England. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 98:483–495.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Borgognini Tarli, S, Canci, A, Piperno, M, Repetto, E. 1993. Dati archeologici e antropologici sulle sepolture mesolithiche della Grotta dell’Uzzo (Trapini). Bullettino di Paletnologia Italiana 84:85–179.Google Scholar
Borgognini Tarli, S, Silvana, M, Repetto, E. 1985. Diet, dental features and oral pathology in the Mesolithic samples from Uzzo and Molara Caves (Sicily). In: Malon, C, Stoddart, S, editors. Papers in Italian Archaeology IV (II): Prehistory. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 244; p. 87–100.Google Scholar
Borgognini Tarli, SM, Repetto, E. 1986. Skeletal indicators of subsistence patterns and activity regime in the Mesolithic sample from Grotta dell’Uzzo (Trapani, Sicily): a case study. Human Evolution 1:1–21.Google Scholar
Boros-Major, A, Bono, A, Lovasz, G, et al. 2011. New perspectives in biomolecular paleopathology of ancient tuberculosis: a proteomic approach. Journal of Archaeological Science 38:197–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bos, KI, Harkins, KM, Herbig, A, et al. 2014. Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World tuberculosis. Nature 514:494–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bos, KI, Schuenemann, VJ, Golding, GB, et al. 2011. A draft genome of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death. Nature 478:506–510.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Botella, MC, Alemán, I, Jiménez, SA. 2000. Los Huesos Humanos: Manipulatión y Altraciones. Barcelona, Spain: Edicións Bellaterra.Google Scholar
Boulestin, B, Zeeb-Lanz, A, Jeunesse, C, et al. 2009. Mass cannibalism in the Linear Pottery culture at Herxheim (Palatinate, Germany). Antiquity 83:968–982.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boulle, E-L. 2001. Evolution of two human skeletal markers of the squatting position: a diachronic study from antiquity to the modern age. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 115:50–56.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bourdieu, P. 1977. Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bourque, BJ, Krueger, HW. 1994. Dietary reconstruction from human bone isotopes for five coastal New England populations. In: Sobolik, KD, editor. Paleonutrition: The Diet and Health of Prehistoric Americans. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Occasional Paper, No. 22; p. 195–209.Google Scholar
Boutton, TW, Lynott, MJ, Bumsted, MP. 1991. Stable carbon isotopes and the study of prehistoric human diet. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 30:373–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bouvier, M, Hylander, WL. 1981. Effect of bone strain on cortical bone structure in macaques (Macaca mulatta). Journal of Morphology 167:1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bouvier, M, Hylander, WL. 1982. The effect of dietary consistency on gross and histologic morphology in the craniofacial region of young rats. American Journal of Anatomy 170:117–126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bouvier, M, Hylander, WL. 1984. The effect of dietary consistency on morphology of the mandibular condylar cartilage in young macaques (Macaca mulatta). In: Dixon, AD, Sarnat, BG, editors. Factors and Mechanisms Influencing Bone Growth. New York, NY: Alan R. Liss; p. 569–579.Google Scholar
Bouvier, M, Zimny, ML. 1987. Effects of mechanical loads on surface morphology of the condylar cartilage of the mandible in rats. Acta Anatomica 129:293–300.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bouwman, AS, Brown, TA. 2005. The limits of biomolecular palaeopathology: ancient DNA cannot be used to study venereal syphilis. Journal of Archaeological Science 32:702–713.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bovee, DL, Owsley, DW. 1994. Evidence of warfare at the Heerwald site. In: Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL, editors. Skeletal Biology in the Great Plains: Migration, Warfare, Health, and Subsistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 355–362.Google Scholar
Bowen, WH. 1994. Food components and caries. Advances in Dental Research 8:215–220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boyd, DC. 1986. A comparison of Mouse Creek phase to Dallas and Middle Cumberland culture skeletal remains. In: Levy, JE, editor. Skeletal Analysis in Southeastern Archaeology. North Carolina Archaeological Council Publication, No. 24; p. 103–126.Google Scholar
Boyd, DC, Boyd, CC. 1989. A comparison of Tennessee Archaic and Mississippian maximum femoral lengths and midshaft diameters: subsistence change and postcranial variability. Southeastern Archaeology 8:107–116.Google Scholar
Boyd, DCM. 1988. A Functional Model for Masticatory-Related Mandibular, Dental, and Craniofacial Microevolutionary Change Derived from a Selected Southeastern Indian Skeletal Temporal Series. PhD Dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.Google Scholar
Brabant, H. 1967. Palaeostomatology. In: Brothwell, DR, Sandison, AT, editors. Diseases in Antiquity. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas; p. 538–550.Google Scholar
Brace, CL. 1995. Biocultural interaction and the mechanism of mosaic evolution in the emergence of “modern” morphology. American Anthropologist 97:711–721.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brace, CL, Hinton, RJ. 1981. Oceanic tooth-size variation as a reflection of biological and cultural mixing. Current Anthropology 22:549–569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brace, CL, Mahler, PE. 1971. Post-Pleistocene changes in the human dentition. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 34:191–204.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brace, CL, Nagai, M. 1982. Japanese tooth size: past and present. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 59:399–411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brace, CL, Rosenberg, KR, Hunt, KD. 1987. Gradual change in human tooth size in the late Pleistocene and post Pleistocene. Evolution 41:705–720.Google ScholarPubMed
Brace, CL, Smith, SL, Hunt, KD. 1991. What big teeth you had grandma! Human tooth size, past and present. In: Kelley, MA, Larsen, CS, editors. Advances in Dental Anthropology. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 33–57.Google Scholar
Braidwood, RJ. 1967. Prehistoric Men, Seventh Edition. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman.Google Scholar
Brandt, G, Haak, W, Adler, CJ, et al. 2013. Ancient DNA reveals key stages in the formation of central European mitochondrial genetic diversity. Science 342:257–261.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Braun, M, Cook, DC, Pfeiffer, S. 1998. DNA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex identified in North American, pre-Columbian human skeletal remains. Journal of Archaeological Science 25:271–277.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brickley, M. 2006. Rib fractures in the archaeological record: a useful source of sociocultural information?International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 16:61–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brickley, M, Ives, R. 2006. Skeletal manifestations of infantile scurvy. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 129:163–172.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brickley, M, Ives, R. 2008. The Bioarchaeology of Metabolic Bone Disease. Oxford, UK: Elsevier Academic Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brickley, M, Mays, S, Ives, R. 2005. Skeletal manifestations of vitamin D deficiency osteomalacia in documented skeletal collections. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 15:389–403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brickley, M, Mays, S, Ives, R. 2007. An investigation of skeletal indicators of vitamin D deficiency in adults: effective markers for interpreting past living conditions and pollution levels in 18th and 19th century Birmingham, England. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 132:67–79.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridges, PS. 1989a. Spondylolysis and its relationship to degenerative joint disease in the prehistoric southeastern United States. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 79:321–329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridges, PS. 1989b. Changes in activities with the shift to agriculture in the southeastern United States. Current Anthropology 30:385–394.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1990. Osteological correlates of weapon use. In: Buikstra, JE, editor. A Life in Science: Papers in Honor of J. Lawrence Angel. Center for American Archeology, Scientific Papers, No. 6; p. 87–98.Google Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1991a. Degenerative joint disease in hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists from the southeastern United States. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 85:379–391.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridges, PS. 1991b. Skeletal evidence of changes in subsistence activities between the Archaic and Mississippian time periods in northwestern Alabama. In: Powell, ML, Bridges, PS, Mires, AMW, editors. What Mean These Bones? Studies in Southeastern Bioarchaeology. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press; p. 89–101.Google Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1992. Prehistoric arthritis in the Americas. Annual Review of Anthropology 21:67–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1993. The effect of variation in methodology on the outcome of osteoarthritic studies. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 3:289–295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1994. Vertebral arthritis and physical activities in the prehistoric southeastern United States. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 93:83–93.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridges, PS. 1995. Skeletal biology and behavior in ancient humans. Evolutionary Anthropology 4:112–120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bridges, PS. 1996. Warfare and mortality at Koger’s Island, Alabama. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 6:66–75.3.0.CO;2-J>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bridges, PS, Blitz, JH, Solano, MC. 2000. Changes in long bone diaphyseal strength with horticultural intensification in west-central Illinois. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 112:217–238.3.0.CO;2-E>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridges, PS, Jacobi, KP, Powell, ML. 2000. Warfare-related trauma in the late prehistory of Alabama. In: Lambert, PM, editor. Bioarchaeological Studies in the Age of Agriculture: A View from the Southeast. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press; p. 35–62.Google Scholar
Brinch, O, Møller-Christensen, V. 1949. On comparative investigations into the occurrence of dental caries in archaeological skulls. Odontologisk Tidskrift 57:357–373.Google Scholar
Brinker, RA. 1985. Pelvic index in Illinois Hopewell. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 66:150.Google Scholar
Brock, SL. 1985. Biomechanical Adaptation of the Lower Limb Bones through Time in the Prehistoric Southwest. PhD Dissertation, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.Google Scholar
Brock, SL, Ruff, CB. 1988. Diachronic patterns of change in structural properties of the femur in the prehistoric American Southwest. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 75:113–127.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brooks, ST. 1955. Skeletal age at death: the reliability of cranial and pubic age indicators. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 13:567–597.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brosch, R, Gordon, SV, Marmiesse, M, et al. 2002. A new evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99:3684–3689.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brothwell, DR. 1959. Teeth in earlier human populations. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 18:59–65.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brothwell, DR. 1961. The palaeopathology of early British man: an essay on the problems of diagnosis and analysis. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 91:318–344.Google Scholar
Brothwell, D. 1971. Forensic aspects of the so-called Neolithic skeleton Q1 from Maiden Castle, Dorset. World Archaeology 3:233–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brothwell, DR. 1981. Digging up Bones: The Excavation, Treatment and Study of Human Skeletal Remains, Third Edition. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Brothwell, DR. 1987. Decay and disorder in the York Jewbury skeletons. In: Boddington, A, Garland, AN, Janaway, RC, editors. Death, Decay and Reconstruction: Approaches to Archaeological and Forensic Science. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press; p. 22–26.Google Scholar
Brothwell, DR. 2005. North American treponematosis against the bigger world picture. In: Powell, ML, Cook, DC, editors. The Myth of Syphilis: The Natural History of Treponematosis in North America. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida; p. 480–496.Google Scholar
Brothwell, DR, Powers, R, Hirst, S. 2000. The pathology. In: Rahtz, P, Hirst, S, Wrights, SM, editors. Cannington Cemetery: Excavations 1962–3 of Prehistoric, Roman and Later Features at Cannington Park Quarry, Near Bridgewater, Somerset. London, UK: Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies; p. 195–256.Google Scholar
Brower, AC. 1977. Cortical defect of the humerus at the insertion of the pectoralis major. American Journal of Roentgenology 128:677–678.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Browman, DL. 1978. Towards the development of the Tihuanaco (Tiwanaku) state. In: Browman, DL, editor. Advances in Andean Archaeology. The Hague, the Netherlands: Mouton; p. 327–349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, AB. 1973. Bone Strontium Content as a Dietary Indicator in Human Skeletal Populations. PhD Dissertation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Brown, AB. 1988. Diet and nutritional stress. In: Blakely, RL, editor. The King Site: Continuity and Contact in Sixteenth-Century Georgia. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press; p. 73–86.Google Scholar
Brown, JA. 1971. Approaches to the Social Dimensions of Mortuary Practices. Memoirs of the Society for American Archaeology, No. 25.Google Scholar
Brown, KA, Brown, TA. 2013. Biomolecular archaeology. Annual Review of Anthropology 42:159–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, PJ, Armelagos, GJ, Maes, KC. 2011. Humans in a world of microbes: the anthropology of infectious disease. In: Singer, M, Erickson, PI, editors. A Companion to Medical Anthropology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 253–269.Google Scholar
Brown, T. 1992. Developmental, morphological and functional aspects of occlusion in Australian Aboriginals. In: Lukacs JR, editor. Culture, Ecology and Dental Anthropology. Journal of Human Ecology 2 (Special Issue):73–85.
Brown, T, Brown, K. 2011. Biomolecular Archaeology: An Introduction. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, T, Molnar, S. 1990. Interproximal grooving and task activity in Australia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 81:545–553.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bruwelheide, KS, Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL. 2010. Burials from the fourth mission church at Pecos. In: Morgan, ME, editor. Pecos Pueblo Revisited: The Biological and Social Context. Cambridge, MA: Papers of the Peabody Museum, Volume 85; p. 129–160.Google Scholar
Buckberry, J. 2008. Off with their heads: the Anglo-Saxon execution cemetery at Walkington Wold, East Yorkshire. In: Murphy, EM, editor. Deviant Burial in the Archaeological Record. Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books; p. 148–168.Google Scholar
Buckland, PC, Amorosi, T, Barlow, LK, et al. 1996. Bioarchaeological and climatological evidence for the fate of Norse farmers in Medieval Greenland. Antiquity 70:88–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bufkin, WJ. 1971. The avulsive cortical irregularity. American Journal of Roentgenology 112:487–492.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buhlin, K, Gustafsson, A, Pockley, G, Frostegard, J, Klinge, B. 2003. Risk factors for cariovascular disease in patients with periodontitis. European Heart Journal 24:2099–2107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buhr, AJ, Cooke, AM. 1959. Fracture patterns. The Lancet 1:531–536.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buikstra, JE. 1975. Cultural and biological variability: a comparison of models. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 42:293.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 1976a. Hopewell in the Lower Illinois Valley: A Regional Study of Human Biological Variability and Prehistoric Mortuary Behavior. Northwestern Archaeological Program Scientific Papers, No. 2.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 1976b. The Caribou Eskimo: general and specific disease. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 45:351–368.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buikstra, JE. 1977a. Biocultural dimensions of archeological study: a regional perspective. In: Blakely, RL, editor. Biocultural Adaptation in Prehistoric America. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press; p. 67–84.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 1977b. Differential diagnosis: an epidemiological model. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 20:316–328.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 1980. Epigenetic distance: a study of biological variability in the lower Illinois River valley. In: Browman, DL, editor. Early Native Americans: Prehistoric Demography, Economy and Technology. The Hague, the Netherlands: Mouton; p. 271–299.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 1992. Diet and disease in late prehistory. In: Verano, JW, Ubelaker, DH, editors. Disease and Demography in the Americas. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 87–101.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 2006. Preface. In: Buikstra, JE, Beck, LA, editors. Bioarchaeology: The Contextual Analysis of Human Remains. Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Academic Elsevier; p. xvii–xx.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE. 2010. Paleopathology: a contemporary perspective. In: Larsen, CS, editor. A Companion to Biological Anthropology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 395–411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Autry, W, Breitburg, E, Eisenberg, L, van der Merwe, N. 1988. Diet and health in the Nashville Basin: human adaptation and maize agriculture in Middle Tennessee. In: Kennedy, BV, LeMoine, GM, editors. Diet and Subsistence: Current Archaeological Perspectives. Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary, Proceedings of the 19th Annual Chacmool Conference; p. 243–259.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Baker, BJ, Cook, DC. 1993. What diseases plagued ancient Egyptians? A century of controversy considered. In: Davis, WV, Walker, R, editors. Biological Anthropology and the Study of Ancient Egypt. London, UK: British Museum Press; p. 24–53.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Beck, LA, editors. 2006. Bioarchaeology: The Contextual Analysis of Human Remains. Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Bullington, J, Charles, DK, et al. 1987. Diet, demography, and the development of horticulture. In: Keegan, WF, editor. Emergent Horticultural Economies of the Eastern Woodlands. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Center for Archaeological Investigations Occasional Paper, No.7; p. 67–85.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Cook, DC. 1978. Pre-Columbian tuberculosis: an epidemiological approach. Medical College of Virginia Quarterly 14:32–44.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Cook, DC. 1980. Palaeopathology: an American account. Annual Review of Anthropology 9:433–470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Cook, DC. 1981. Pre-Columbian tuberculosis in west-central Illinois: prehistoric disease in biocultural perspective. In: Buikstra, JE, editor. Prehistoric Tuberculosis in the Americas. Center for American Archeology, Scientific Papers, No. 5; p. 115–139.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Frankenberg, SR, Konigsberg, LW. 1990. Skeletal biological distance studies in American physical anthropology: recent trends. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 82:1–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buikstra, JE, Frankenburg, S, Lambert, JB, Xue, L. 1989. Multiple elements: multiple expectations. In: Price, TD, editor. The Chemistry of Prehistoric Human Bone. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 155–210.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Konigsberg, LW. 1985. Paleodemography: critiques and controversies. American Anthropologist 87:316–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Konigsberg, LW, Bullington, J. 1986. Fertility and the development of agriculture in the prehistoric Midwest. American Antiquity 51:528–546.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Milner, GR. 1991. Isotopic and archaeological interpretations of diet in the central Mississippi valley. Journal of Archaeological Science 18:319–329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Ubelaker, D, editors. 1994. Standards for Data Collection from Human Skeletal Remains. Arkansas Archaeological Survey Research Series, No. 44.Google Scholar
Buikstra, JE, Williams, S. 1991. Tuberculosis in the Americas: current perspectives. In: Ortner, DJ, Aufderheide, AC, editors. Human Paleopathology: Current Syntheses and Future Options. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 161–172.Google Scholar
Bulbeck, D, Lauer, A. 2006. Human variation and evolution in Holocene peninsular Malaysia. In: Oxenham, M, Tayles, N, editors. Bioarchaeology of Southeast Asia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 133–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bulger, EM, Arneson, MA, Mock, CN, Jurkovich, GJ. 2000. Rib fractures in the elderly. Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection and Critical Care 48:1040–1046.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bullen, AK. 1972. Paleoepidemiology and distribution of prehistoric treponemiasis (syphilis) in Florida. Florida Anthropologist 25:133–174.Google Scholar
Bullen, AK. 1973. Some human skeletal remains from Amelia Island, Florida. In: Hemmings, ET, Deagan, KA, editors. Excavations on Amelia Island in Northeast Florida. Contributions of the Florida State Museum: Anthropology and History, No.18; p. 72–87.Google Scholar
Bullington, J. 1991. Deciduous dental microwear of prehistoric juveniles from the lower Illinois River valley. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 84:59–73.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bullion, SK. 1986. Information from teeth on the growth and developmental history of individuals. In: Cruwys, E, Foley, RA, editors. Teeth and Anthropology. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 291; p. 133–136.Google Scholar
Bumsted, MP. 1984. Human Variation: δ13C in Adult Bone Collagen and the Relation to Diet in an Isochronous C4 (Maize) Archaeological Population. Los Alamos, NM: Los Alamos National Laboratory.Google Scholar
Burbank, VK. 1994. Fighting Women: Anger and Aggression in Aboriginal Australia. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Buretić-Tomljanović, A, Ostojić, S, Kapović, M. 2006. Secular change of craniofacial measures in Croatian younger adults. American Journal of Human Biology 18:668–675.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burger, J, Thomas, MG. 2011. The palaeopopulation genetics of humans, cattle and dairying in Neolithic Europe. In: Pinhasi, R, Stock, JT, editors. Human Bioarchaeology of the Transition to Agriculture. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 371–384.Google Scholar
Burger, RL, Lee-Thorp, JA, van der Merwe, NJ. 2003. Rite and crop in the Inca state revisited: an isotopic perspective from Machu Picchu and beyond. In: Burger, RL, Salazar, LC, editors. The 1912 Yale Peruvian Scientific Expedition Collections from Machu Picchu Human and Animal Remains. Yale University Publications in Anthropology, No. 85; p. 119–137.Google Scholar
Burne, R. 1998. Oral streptococci: products of their environment. Journal of Dental Research 77:445–452.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burns, PE. 1979. Log-linear analysis of dental caries occurrence in four skeletal series. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 51:637–648.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burns, PE. 1982. A Study of Sexual Dimorphism in the Dental Pathology of Ancient Peoples. PhD Dissertation, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.Google Scholar
Burr, DB. 1980. The relationship among physical, geometrical and mechanical properties of bone, with a note on the properties of nonhuman primate bone. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 23:109–146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burr, DB, Allen, MR, editors. 2013. Basic and Applied Bone Biology. London, UK: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Burr, DB, Forwood, MR, Fyhrie, DP, et al. 1997. Bone microdamage and skeletal fragility in osteoporotic and stress fractures. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 12:6–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burr, DB, Ruff, CB, Thompson, DD. 1990. Patterns of skeletal histologic change through time: comparison of an archaic Native American population with modern populations. Anatomical Record 226:307–313.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burr, DB, Schaffler, MB, Yang, KH, et al. 1989. The effects of altered strain environments on bone tissue kinetics. Bone 10:215–221.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burrell, LL, Maas, MC, Van Gerven, DP. 1986. Patterns of long-bone fracture in two Nubian cemeteries. Human Evolution 1:495–506.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burt, BA. 1993. Relative consumption of sucrose and other sugars: has it been a factor in reduced caries experience?Caries Research 27(S1):56–63.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burt, BA, Eklund, SA, Landis, JR, et al. 1982. Diet and dental health, a study of relationships. National Center for Health Statistics Series 11:225.Google Scholar
Burt, BA, Eklund, SA, Morgan, KJ, et al. 1988. The effects of sugars intake and frequency of ingestion on dental caries increment in a three-year longitudinal study. Journal of Dental Research 67:1422–1429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burt, BA, Ismail, AI. 1986. Diet, nutrition, and food cariogenicity. Journal of Dental Research 65(Special Issue):1475–1484.Google Scholar
Burt, BA, Pai, S. 2001. Sugar consumption and caries risk: a systematic review. Journal of Dental Education 65:1017–1023.Google ScholarPubMed
Burton, JH. 1996. Trace elements in bone as paleodietary indicators. In: Orna, MV, editor. Archaeological Chemistry: Organic, Inorganic, and Biochemical Analysis. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society; p. 327–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burton, JH. 2008. Bone chemistry and trace element analysis. In: Katzenberg, MA, Saunders, SR, editors. Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Liss; p. 443–460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burton, JH, Price, TD. 1990a. Paleodietary applications of barium values in bone. In: Pernicka, E, Wagner, GA, editors. Proceedings of the 27th International Symposium on Archaeometry. Basel, Switzerland: Berkhauser Verlag AG; p. 1–9.Google Scholar
Burton, JH, Price, TD. 1990b. The ratio of barium to strontium as a paleodietary indicator of consumption of marine resources. Journal of Archaeological Science 17:547–557.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burton, JH, Wright, LE. 1995. Nonlinearity in the relationship between bone Sr/Ca and diet: paleodietary implications. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 96:273–282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bush, HM, Stirland, A. 1988. Osteological evidence for decapitations in two Romano-British cemeteries. In: Šimic, D, Sujoldžić, A, Turek, S, editors. Abstracts of the 12th International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences. Collegium Anthropologicum 12:344.Google Scholar
Buxton, LHD. 1938. Platymeria and platycnemia. Journal of Anatomy 73:31–36.Google ScholarPubMed
Buzon, MR. 2006. Health of the non-elites at Tombos: nutritional and disease stress in New Kingdom Nubia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 130:26–37.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buzon, MR. 2011. Nubian identity in the Bronze Age: patterns of cultural and biological variation. Bioarchaeology of the Near East 5:19–40.Google Scholar
Buzon, MR. 2012. The bioarchaeological approach to paleopathology. In: Grauer, AL, editor. A Companion to Paleopathology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 58–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buzon, MR, Judd, MA. 2008. Investigating health at Kerma: sacrificial versus nonsacrificial individuals. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 136:93–99.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buzon, MR, Richman, R. 2007. Traumatic injuries and imperialism: the effects of Egyptian colonial strategies at Tombos in Upper Nubia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 133:783–791.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buzon, MR, Simonetti, A, Creaser, RA. 2007. Migration in the Nile Valley during the New Kingdom period: a preliminary strontium isotope study. Journal of Archaeological Science 34:1391–1401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Byrd, JE, Jantz, RL. 1994. Osteological evidence for distinct social groups at the Leavenworth site. In: Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL, editors. Skeletal Biology in the Great Plains: Migration, Warfare, Health, and Subsistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 303–308.Google Scholar
Byrne, KB, Parris, DC. 1987. Reconstruction of the diet of the Middle Woodland Amerindian population at Abbott Farm by bone trace-element analysis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 74:373–384.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cabana, GS, Hunley, K, Kaestle, FA. 2008. Population continuity or replacement? A novel computer simulation approach and its application to the Numic expansion (Western Great Basin, USA). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 135:438–447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cabrera Castro, R. 1993. Human sacrifice at the Temple of the Feathered Serpent: recent discoveries at Teotihuacan. In: Berrin, K, Pasztory, E, editors. Teotihuacan: Art from the City of the Gods. New York, NY: Thames & Hudson; p. 101–107.Google Scholar
Cabrera Castro, R, Sugiyama, S, Cowgill, GL. 1991. The Templo de Quetzalcoatl Project at Teotihuacan: a preliminary report. Ancient Mesoamerica 2:77–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cadien, JD, Harris, EF, Jones, WP, Mandarino, LJ. 1974. Biological lineages, skeletal populations, and microevolution. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 18:194–201.Google Scholar
Caffey, J. 1931. Clinical and experimental lead poisoning: some roentgenologic and anatomic changes in growing bone. Radiology 17:957–983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calcagno, JM. 1986a. Dental reduction in post-Pleistocene Nubia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 70:349–363.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Calcagno, JM. 1986b. Odontometrics and biological continuity in the Meroitic, X-Group, and Christian phases of Nubia. Current Anthropology 27:66–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calcagno, JM. 1989. Mechanisms of Human Dental Reduction: A Case Study from Post-Pleistocene Nubia. University of Kansas Publications in Anthropology, No. 18.Google Scholar
Calcagno, JM, Gibson, KR. 1991. Selective compromise: evolutionary trends and mechanisms in hominid tooth size. In: Kelley, MA, Larsen, CS, editors. Advances in Dental Anthropology. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 59–76.Google Scholar
Cameron, N, Tobias, P, Fraser, W, Nagdee, M. 1990. Search for secular trends in calvarial diameters, cranial base height, indexes, and capacity in South African Negro crania. American Journal of Human Biology 2:53–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Canci, A, Minozzi, S, Borgognini Tarli, S. 1996. New evidence of tuberculosis spondylitis from Neolithic Liguria (Italy). International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 6:497–501.3.0.CO;2-O>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardoso, HFV. 2007. Environmental effects on skeletal versus dental development: using a documented subadult skeletal sample to test a basic assumption in human osteological research. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 132:223–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardoso, HFV, Gomes, JEA. 2009. Trends in adult stature of peoples who inhabited the modern Portuguese territory from the Mesolithic to the late 20th century. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 19:711–725.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlos, JP, Gittelsohn, AM. 1965. Longitudinal studies of the natural history of caries. II. A life table study of caries incidence in the permanent teeth. Archives of Oral Biology 10:739–751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, DS. 1976. Patterns of morphological variation in the human midface and upper face. In: McNamara, J, editor. Factors Affecting the Growth of the Midface. University of Michigan Center for Human Growth and Development, Craniofacial Growth Series Monograph, No. 6; p. 277–299.Google Scholar
Carlson, DS. 2005. Theories of craniofacial growth in the postgenomic era. Seminars in Orthodontics 11:172–183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, DS, Armelagos, GJ, Van Gerven, DP. 1974. Factors influencing the etiology of cribra orbitalia in prehistoric Nubia. Journal of Human Evolution 3:405–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, DS, Armelagos, GJ, Van Gerven, DP. 1976. Patterns of age-related cortical bone loss (osteoporosis) within the femoral diaphysis. Human Biology 48:295–314.Google ScholarPubMed
Carlson, DS, Van Gerven, DP. 1977. Masticatory function and post-Pleistocene evolution in Nubia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 46:495–506.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carlson, DS, Van Gerven, DP. 1979. Diffusion, biological determinism, and biocultural adaptation in the Nubian Corridor. American Anthropologist 81:561–580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carmichael, AG. 1993. Leprosy. In: Kiple, KF, editor. The Cambridge World History of Human Disease. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 834–839.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carneiro, RL. 1990. Chiefdom-level warfare as exemplified in Fiji and the Cauca Valley. In: Haas, J, editor. The Anthropology of War. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press; p. 190–211Google Scholar
Carnese, FR, Mendisco, F, Keyser, C, et al. 2010. Paleogenetical study of pre-Columbian samples from Pampa Grande (Salta, Argentina). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 141:452–462.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carroll, ST. 1988. Wrestling in ancient Nubia. Journal of Sport History 15:121–137.Google Scholar
Carson, A. 2006. Maximum-likelihood variance components analysis of heritabilities of cranial nonmetric traits. Human Biology 78:383–402.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carson, J. 1985. Colonial Virginia Cookery: Procedures, Equipment, and Ingredients in Colonial Cooking. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.Google Scholar
Carter, DR, Beaupré, GS. 2001. Skeletal Function and Form: Mechanobiology of Skeletal Development, Aging, and Regeneration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Carvalho, ML, Marques, AF, Lima, MT, Reus, U. 2004. Trace element distribution and post-mortem intake in human bones from Middle Age by total reflection X-ray fluorescence. Spectrochimica Acta Part B: Atomic Spectroscopy 59:1251–1257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cassidy, CM. 1984. Skeletal evidence for prehistoric subsistence adaptation in the central Ohio River valley. In: Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orlando, FL: Academic Press; p. 307–345.Google Scholar
Cavalli-Sforza, LL, Menozzi, P, Piazza, A. 1996. The History and Geography of Human Genes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Chagnon, N. 1992. Yanomamö, Fourth Edition. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace Janovich.Google Scholar
Chakrabarti, D. 1980. Early agriculture and the development of towns in India. In: Sherrat, A, editor. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Archaeology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 162–167.Google Scholar
Chamay, A, Tschantz, P. 1972. Mechanical influences in bone remodeling: experimental research on Wolff’s Law. Journal of Biomechanics 5:173–180.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chamberlain, AT. 2006. Demography in Archaeology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chamberlain, AT, Parker Pearson, M. 2001. Earthly Remains: The History and Science of Preserved Bodies. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Chapman, FH. 1972. Vertebral osteophytosis in prehistoric populations of central and southern Mexico. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 36:31–37.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chapman, NEM. 1997. Evidence for Spanish influence on activity induced musculoskeletal stress markers at Pecos Pueblo. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 7:497–506.3.0.CO;2-H>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chapman, R, Kinnes, I, Randsborg, K. 1981. The Archaeology of Death. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Chard, CS. 1974. Northeast Asia in Prehistory. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
Chari, S, Lavallee, MN, editors. 2013. Accomplishing NAGPRA: Perspectives on the Intent, Impact, and Future of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Press.Google Scholar
Charles, RH. 1893. The influence of function, as exemplified in the morphology of the lower extremity of the Punjabi. Journal of Anatomy and Physiology 28:1–18.Google Scholar
Chase, AF, Chase, DZ. 2001. The Royal Court of Caracol, Belize: its palaces and people. In: Inomata, T, Houston, SD, editors. Royal Courts of the Ancient Maya, Volume 2. Boulder, CO: Westview; p. 102–137.Google Scholar
Chatters, JC, Kennett, DJ, Asmerom, Y, et al. 2014. Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans. Science 344:750–754.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chenery, C, Eckardt, H, Muldner, G. 2011. Cosmopolitan Catterick? Isotopic evidence for population mobility on Rome’s northern frontier. Journal of Archaeological Science 38:1525–1536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chesson, MS, editor. 2001. Social Memory, Identity and Death: Anthropological Perspectives on Mortuary Rituals. Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, No. 10.
Chesterman, JT. 1983. The human skeletal remains. In: Hedges, JW, editor. Isbister: A Chambered Tomb in Orkney. British Archaeological Report, British Series, No. 115; p. 73–132.Google Scholar
Cheverud, JM, Buikstra, JE. 1981a. Quantitative genetics of skeletal nonmetric traits in the rhesus macaques of Cayo Santiago. II. Phenotypic, genetic and environmental correlations between traits. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 54:51–58.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cheverud, JM, Buikstra, JE. 1981b. Quantitative genetics of skeletal nonmetric traits in the rhesus macaques on Cayo Santiago. I. Single trait heritabilities. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 49:43–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheverud, JM, Buikstra, JE. 1982. Quantitative genetics of skeletal nonmetric traits in the rhesus macaques of Cayo Santiago. III. Relative heritability of skeletal nonmetric and metric traits. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 59:151–155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cheverud, JM, Buikstra, JE, Twitchell, E. 1979. Relationships between non-metric skeletal traits and cranial size and shape. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 50:191–198.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chhem, RK, Brothwell, DR. 2007. Paleoradiology: Imaging Mummies and Fossils. Berlin, Germany: Springer.Google Scholar
Chhem, RK, Rühli, FJ. 2004. Paleoradiology of mummies, skeletal remains and hominid fossils. Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal 55:193–279.Google Scholar
Chisholm, B, Koike, H. 1999. Reconstructing prehistoric Japanese diet using stable isotopic analysis. In: Omoto, K, editor. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Origins of the Japanese. International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto; p. 199–222.Google Scholar
Chisholm, B, Koike, H, Nakai, N. 1992. Carbon isotopic determination of paleodiet in Japan: marine versus terrestrial resources. In: Aikens, CM, Nai Rhee, S, editors. Pacific Northeast Asia in Prehistory: Hunter-Fisher-Gatherers, Farmer, and Sociopolitical Elites. Pullman, WA: Washington State University Press; p. 69–74.Google Scholar
Cho, H, Stout, SD. 2003. Bone remodeling and age-associated bone loss in the past: a histomorphometric analysis of the Imperial Roman skeletal population of Isola Sacra. In: Agarwal, SC, Stout, SD, editors. Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An Anthropological Perspective. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic Plenum; p. 207–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cho, H, Stout, SD, Bishop, TA. 2006. Cortical bone remodeling rates in a sample of African American and European American descent groups from the American Midwest: comparisons of age and sex in ribs. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 130:214–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Choy, K, Ok-Ryun, J, Fuller, BT, Richards, MP. 2010. Isotopic evidence of dietary variations and weaning practices in the Gaya cemetery at Yeanri, Gimhae, South Korea. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 142:74–84.Google ScholarPubMed
Christensen, AF. 1998. Odontometric microevolution in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico. Journal of Human Evolution 34:333–360.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Christensen, AF, Winter, M. 1997. Culturally modified skeletal remains from the site of Huamelulpan, Oaxaca, Mexico. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 7:467–480.3.0.CO;2-1>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Christopherson, KM, Pedersen, PO. 1939. Investigations into dental conditions in the Neolithic period and in the Bronze Age in Denmark. Dental Record 59:575–585.Google Scholar
Churchill, SE. 1994. Human Upper Body Evolution in the Eurasian Later Pleistocene. PhD Dissertation, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.Google Scholar
Churchill, SE, Smith, FH. 2000. Makers of the Early Aurignacian of Europe. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 43:61–115.3.0.CO;2-3>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cicchitti, A. 1993. Pompei: Il Primo Calco Trasparente (Diario di un Scavo). Rome, Italy: L’Erma di Bretschneider.Google Scholar
Ciranni, R, Fornaciari, G. 2003. Luigi Boccherini and the Barocco cello: an 18th century striking case of occupational disease. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 13:294–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clabeaux, MS. 1977. Health and disease in the population of an Iroquois ossuary. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 20:359–370.Google Scholar
Clark, AL, Tayles, N, Halcrow, SE. 2014. Aspects of health in prehistoric mainland Southeast Asia: indicators of stress in response to the intensification of rice agriculture. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 153:484–495.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, GA. 1988. New method for assessing changes in growth and sexual dimorphism in paleoepidemiology. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 77:105–116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, GA, Hall, NR, Armelagos, GJ, et al. 1986 Poor growth prior to early childhood: decreased health and life-span in the adult. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 70:145–160.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, JGD. 1972. Star Carr: A Case Study in Bioarchaeology. Reading, MA: Addison-Welsey.Google Scholar
Clarke, N. 1993. Periodontitis in dry skulls. Dental Anthropology Newsletter 7:1–4.Google Scholar
Clarke, NB, Carey, SE, Srikandi, W, Hirsch, RS, Leppard, PI. 1986. Periodontal disease in ancient populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 71:173–183.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clarke, NG, Hirsch, RS. 1991. Physiological, pulpal, and periodontal factors influencing alveolar bone. In: Kelley, MA, Larsen, CS, editors. Advances in Dental Anthropology. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 241–266.Google Scholar
Clarke, SK. 1980. Early childhood morbidity trends in prehistoric populations. Human Biology 52:79–85.Google ScholarPubMed
Clarke, SK, Gindhart, PS. 1981. Commonality in peak age of early-childhood morbidity across cultures and over time. Current Anthropology 22:574–575.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarkson, JE, Worthington, HV. 1993. Association between untreated caries and age, gender and dental attendance in adults. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology 21:126–128.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Claussen, BF. 1982. Chronic hypertrophy of the ulna in the professional rodeo cowboy. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 164:45–47.Google Scholar
Clement, AF, Hillson, SW. 2012. Intrapopulation variation in macro tooth wear patterns – a case study from Igloolik, Canada. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 149:517–524.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coale, AJ. 1972. The Growth and Structure of Human Populations. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Coatsworth, JH. 1996. Welfare. The American Historical Review 101:1–12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cockburn, TA, Cockburn, E, Reyman, TA, editors. 1998. Mummies, Disease and Ancient Cultures. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coggon, D, Kellingray, S, Inskip, H, et al. 1998. Osteoarthritis of the hip and occupational lifting. American Journal of Epidemiology 147:523–528.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cohen, MN. 1989. Health and the Rise of Civilization. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Cohen, MN. 1998. The emergence of health and social inequalities in the archaeological record. In: Strickland, SS, Shetty, PS, editors. Human Biology and Social Inequality. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 249–271.Google Scholar
Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. 1984. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orlando, FL: Academic Press. (Reprinted, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2013.)Google Scholar
Cohen, MN, Baum, BJ, Garn, SM, Osorio, CH, Nagy, HM. 1979. Crown-size reduction in congenital defects. In: Dahlberg, A, Graber, TM, editors. Orofacial Growth and Development. The Hague, the Netherlands: Mouton; p. 119–126.Google Scholar
Cohen, MN, Crane-Kramer, GMM, editors. 2007. Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
Cohen, MN, O’Connor, K, Danforth, M, Jacobi, K, Armstrong, C. 1994. Health and death and Tipu. In: Larsen, CS, Milner, GR, editors. In the Wake of Contact: Biological Responses to Conquest. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 121–133.Google Scholar
Cole, G, Waldron, T. 2011. Apple Down 152: a putative case of syphilis from sixth century AD Anglo-Saxon England. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 144:72–79.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cole, GG, Hill, MC, Ensor, HB. 1982. Bioarchaeological comparisons of the Late Miller III and Summerville I phases in the Gainesville Lake Area. In: Jenkins, NJ, editor. Archaeology of the Gainesville Lake Area: Synthesis. University of Alabama, Office of Archaeological Research, Report of Investigations, No. 23; p. 187–258.Google Scholar
Cole, MS, Cole, TM 1994. Metric variation in the supraorbital region in northern Plains Indians. In: Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL, editors. Skeletal Biology of the Great Plains: Migration, Warfare, Health, and Subsistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 209–217.Google Scholar
Cole, TM. 1994. Size and shape of the femur and tibia in Northern Plains Indians. In: Owsley, DW, Jantz, RL, editors. Skeletal Biology of the Great Plains: Migration, Warfare, Health, and Subsistence. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; p. 219–233.Google Scholar
Collins, HB. 1951. The Origin and Antiquity of the Eskimo. Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Coltrain, JB, Hayes, MG, O’Rourke, DH. 2006. A radiometric evaluation of Hrdlička’s Aleutian replacement hypothesis: population continuity and morphological change. Current Anthropology 47:537–548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coltrain, JB, Janetski, JC. 2013. The stable andraio-isotope chemistry of southeastern Utah Basketmaker II burials: dietary analysis using the linear mixing model SISUS, age and sex patterning, geolocation and temporal patterning. Journal of Archaeological Science 40:4711–4730.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coltrain, JB, Janetski, JC, Carlyle, SW. 2007. The stable- and radio-isotope chemistry of Western Basketmaker burials: implications for the Early Puebloan diets and origins. American Antiquity 72:301–321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coltrain, JB, Leavitt, SW. 2002. Climate and diet in Fremont prehistory: economic variability and abandonment of maize agriculture in the Great Salt Lake Basin. American Antiquity 67:453–485.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coltrain, JB, Stafford, TW 1999. Stable carbon isotopes and Great Salt Lake wetlands diet: towards an understanding of the Great Basin Formative. In: Hemphill, BE, Larsen, CS, editors. Prehistoric Lifeways in the Great Basin Wetlands: Bioarchaeological Reconstruction and Interpretation. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah Press; p. 55–83.Google Scholar
Comuzzie, AG, Steele, DG. 1989. Enlarged occlusal surfaces on first molars due to severe attrition and hypercementosis: examples from prehistoric coastal populations of Texas. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 78:9–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Condon, K, Rose, JC. 1992. Intertooth and intratooth variability in the occurrence of developmental defects. In: Goodman AH, Capasso LL, editors. Recent Contributions to the Study of Enamel Developmental Defects. Journal of Paleopathology, Monographic Publications, No. 2; p. 61–77.
Condon, KW. 1981. The correspondence of developmental enamel defects between the mandibular canine and first premolar. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 54:211.Google Scholar
Condon, RG. 1983. Seasonal photoperiodism, activity rhythms, and disease susceptibility in the central Canadian Arctic. Arctic Anthropology 20:33–48.Google Scholar
Conklin, BA. 2001. Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in an Amazonian Society. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Conlee, C. 2007. Decapitation and rebirth: a headless burial from Nazca, Peru. Current Anthropology 48:438–445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conlee, CA, Buzon, MR, Gutierrez, AN, Simonetti, A, Creaser, RA. 2009. Identifying foreigners versus locals in a burial population from Nasca, Peru: an investigation using strontium isotope analysis. Journal of Archaeological Science 36:2755–2764.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conner, MD. 1984. Population Structure and Biological Variation in the Late Woodland of West-Central Illinois. PhD Dissertation, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
Conner, MD. 1990. Population structure and skeletal variation in the Late Woodland of West-Central Illinois. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 82:21–43.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Constandse-Westermann, TS. 1982. A skeleton found in a Roman well at Velsen (Province North Holland, the Netherlands). Helinium 22:135–169.Google Scholar
Constandse-Westermann, TS, Newell, RR. 1984. Mesolithic trauma: demographical and chronological trends in western Europe. In: Haneveld, GT, Perizonius, WRK, editors. Proceedings of the Fourth European Meeting of the Paleopathology Association, Middelburg/Antwerpen. Utrecht, the Netherlands: Elinkwjk; p. 70–76.Google Scholar
Constandse-Westermann, TS, Newell, RR. 1989. Limb lateralization and social stratification in western European Mesolithic societies. In: Hershkovitz, I, editor. People and Culture in Change. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, No. 508; p. 405–433.Google Scholar
Constandse-Westermann, TS, Newell, RR. 1990. A diachronic and chronological analysis of lateralization manifestations in the western European Mesolithic skeletal sample: a novel approach to the assessment of social complexity. In: Vermeersch, PM, Van Peer, P, editors. Contributions to the Mesolithic in Europe. Leuven, Belgium: Leuven University Press; p. 95–120.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 1976. Pathologic States and Disease Process in Illinois Woodland Populations: An Epidemiologic Approach. PhD Dissertation, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 1979. Subsistence base and health in prehistoric Illinois Valley: evidence from the human skeleton. Medical Anthropology 3:109–124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, DC. 1981a. Mortality, age structure, and status in the interpretation of stress indicators in prehistoric skeletons: a dental example from the lower Illinois Valley. In: Chapman, R, Kinnes, I, Randsborg, K, editors. The Archaeology of Death. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; p. 133–144.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 1981b. Koniag Eskimo tooth ablation: Was Hrdlička right after all?Current Anthropology 22:159–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, DC. 1984. Subsistence and health in the lower Illinois Valley: osteological evidence. In: Cohen, MN, Armelagos, GJ, editors. Paleopathology at the Origins of Agriculture. Orlando, FL: Academic Press; p. 235–269.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 1990. Epidemiology of circular caries: a perspective from prehistoric skeletons. In: Buikstra, JE, editor. A Life in Science: Papers in Honor of J. Lawrence Angel. Center for American Archeology, Scientific Papers, No. 6; p. 64–86.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 1994. Dental evidence for congenital syphilis (and its absence) before and after the conquest of the New World. In: Dutour, O, Palfi, G, Berato, J, Brun, J-P, editors. L’Origine de la Syphilis en Europe: Avant ou Après 1493?Paris, France: Éditions Errance; p. 169–175.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 2006. The old physical anthropology and the New World: a look at the accomplishments of an antiquated paradigm. In: Buikstra, JE, Beck, LA, editors. Bioarchaeology: The Contextual Analysis of Human Remains. Burlington, VT: Academic Press; p. 27–71.Google Scholar
Cook, DC. 2007. Maize and Mississippians in the American Midwest. In: Cohen, MN, Crane-Kramer, GMM, editors. Ancient Health: Skeletal Indicators of Agricultural and Economic Intensification. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida; p. 10–19.Google Scholar
Cook, DC, Buikstra, JE. 1979. Health and differential survival in prehistoric populations: prenatal dental defects. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 51:649–664.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cook, DC, Buikstra, JE, DeRousseau, CJ, Johanson, DC. 1983. Vertebral pathology in the Afar australopithecines. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 60:83–101.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cook, DC, Powell, ML. 2012. Treponematosis: past, present, and future. In: Grauer, AL, editor. A Companion to Paleopathology. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell; p. 472–491.Google Scholar
Cook, M, Molto, E, Anderson, C. 1989. Fluorochrome labelling in Roman period skeletons from Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 80:137–143.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cook, RA. 2005. Reconstructing perishable architecture: prospects and limitations of a Fort Ancient example. North American Archaeologist 26:357–388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, RA. 2012. Dogs of war: potential social institutions of conflict, healing, and death in a Fort Ancient village. American Antiquity 77:498–523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, RA, Aubry, BS. 2014. Aggregation, interregional interaction, and postmarital residence patterning: a study of biological variation in the late prehistoric middle Ohio Valley. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 154:270–278.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cook, RA, Schurr, MR. 2009. Eating between the lines: Mississippian migration and stable carbon isotope variation in Fort Ancient populations. American Anthropologist 111:344–359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooke, RG, Norr, L, Piperno, DR. 1996. Native Americans and the Panamanian landscape. In: Reitz, EJ, Newsom, LA, Scudder, SJ, editors. Case Studies in Environmental Archaeology. New York, NY: Plenum Press; p. 103–126.Google Scholar
Coon, CS, Garn, SM, Birdsell, JB. 1950. Races: A Study of the Problems of Race Formation in Man. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.Google Scholar
Cooper, C, Cawley, M, Bhalla, A, et al. 1995. Childhood growth, physical activity, and peak bone mass in women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 10:940–947.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooper, C, McAlindon, T, Coggon, D, Egger, P, Dieppe, P. 1994. Occupational activity and osteoarthritis of the knee. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 53:90–93.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooper, JF. 1919. The Last of the Mohicans. New York, NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
Coppa, A, Bondioli, L, Cucina, A, et al. 2006. Early Neolithic tradition of dentistry. Nature 440:755.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coppa, A, Cucina, A, Chiarelli, B, Calderon, FL, Mancinelli, D. 1995. Dental anthropology and paleodemography of the Precolumbian populations of Hispaniola from the third millennium B.C. to the Spanish conquest. Human Evolution 10:153–167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corbett, ME, Moore, WJ. 1976. The distribution of dental caries in ancient British populations: the 19th century. Caries Research 10:401–412.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cornejo, OE, Lefébure, T, Pavinski Bitar, PD, et al. 2013. Evolutionary and population genomics of the cavity causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans. Molecular Biology and Evolution 30:881–893.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS. 1972. The biological relationships of some prehistoric and historic Pueblo populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 37:373–388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS. 1984. An epidemiologic transition in dental occlusion in world populations. American Journal of Orthodontics 82:371–376.Google Scholar
Corruccini, RS. 1991. Anthropological aspects of orofacial and occlusal variations and anomalies. In: Kelley, MA, Larsen, CS, editors. Advances in Dental Anthropology. New York, NY: Wiley-Liss; p. 295–323.Google Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Beecher, RM. 1982. Occlusal variation related to soft diet in a nonhuman primate. Science 218:74–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Beecher, RM. 1984. Occlusofacial morphological integration lowered in baboons raised on soft diet. Journal of Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology 4:135–142.Google ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS, Choudhury, AFH. 1985. Dental occlusal variation among rural and urban Bengali youths. Human Biology 58:61–66.Google Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Handler, JS. 1980. Temporomandibular joint size decrease in American Blacks: evidence from Barbados. Journal of Dental Research 59:1528.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS, Handler, JS, Jacobi, KP. 1985. Chronological distribution of enamel hypoplasias and weaning in a Caribbean slave population. Human Biology 57:699–711.Google Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Kaul, SS, Chopra, SRK, et al. 1983. Epidemiological survey of occlusion in north India. British Journal of Orthodontics 10:44–47.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS, Potter, RHY, Dahlberg, AA. 1981. Changing occlusal variation in Pima Amerinds. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 62:317–324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Shimada, I. 2002. Dental relatedness corresponding to mortuary patterning at Huaca Loro, Peru. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117:113–121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS, Townsend, GC, Brown, T. 1990. Occlusal variation in Australian Aboriginals. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 82:257–265.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corruccini, RS, Townsend, GC, Schwerdt, W. 2005. Correspondence between enamel hypoplasia and odontometric biolateral asymmetry in Australian twins. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 126:177–182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corruccini, RS, Whitley, LD. 1981. Occlusal variation in a rural Kentucky community. American Journal of Orthodontics 79:250–262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corti, MC, Rigon, C. 2003. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: prevalence, risk factors and functional impact. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research 15:359–363.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costa, D, Steckel, RH. 1997. Long-term trends in health, welfare, and economic growth in the United States. In: Steckel, RH, Floud, R, editors. Health and Welfare during Industrialization. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press