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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 November 2022

Carson Bay
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Universität Bern, Switzerland
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Biblical Heroes and Classical Culture in Christian Late Antiquity
The Historiography, Exemplarity, and Anti-Judaism of Pseudo-Hegesippus
, pp. 375 - 401
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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