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Adam Contzen the Jesuites Directions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

William Lamont
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
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Summary

Cap. XVI

Is to shew that Princes must determine of nothing in Religion, as having Power to defend that which the Pope determineth of, but no power to appoint or change any thing themselves: or judge of Controversies, as pag. 673. The Church must Judge, and the Prince must Execute.

Cap. XVII

Is to shew, That to preserve Religion, that is, Popery where it is, no other Religion should be permitted: and that Riches tend much to strengthen the Clergy and preserve Religion: And [scorning the poverty of Protestant Ministers], saith, That after their first attempts, their Ministry declineth into meer contempt, and that poverty and necessity forceth them to please the people. Lastly, he perswadeth to speedy punishing of the erroneous, and cutting them off in the first appearance, and to prohibit their Books, and to take heed of Julian's device, of destroying Religion by Liberty for all Sects: [Thus they do in Spain, Italy, Austria, Bavaria &c.].

Cap. XVIII

The way to bring in Popery, and work out the Protestant Religion, [he thus describeth]:

1. That things be carried on by slow but sure proceedings, as a Musician tunes his Instrument by degrees: Lose no opportunity; but yet do not precipitate the work.

R.2. Let no Prince that is willing despair: for it is an easie thing to change Religion. For when the common people are a while taken with Novelties and diversites of Religion, they will sit down and be aweary, and give up themselves to their Ruler's wills. […

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1994

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