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6 - Growth Disruption in Children

Linear Enamel Hypoplasias

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2018

Richard H. Steckel
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Clark Spencer Larsen
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Charlotte A. Roberts
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Joerg Baten
Affiliation:
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Germany
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Summary

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The Backbone of Europe
Health, Diet, Work and Violence over Two Millennia
, pp. 175 - 197
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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