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Chapter 12 - Compassion-Focused Approaches for Clients, Families and Health Care Providers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2018

Douglas Turkington
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University
Helen M. Spencer
Affiliation:
Northumberland, Tyne & Wear NHS Foundation Trust
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Summary

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Information
Back to Life, Back to Normality
CBT Informed Recovery for Families with Relatives with Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses
, pp. 79 - 88
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

Reference

Braehler, C., Harper, J., & Gilbert, P. (2013) Compassion focused group therapy for recovery after psychosis. In Steel, C. (ed.), CBT for schizophrenia: Evidence-based interventions and future directions (pp. 235–66). Chichester, UK: Wiley.Google Scholar

Additional Reading

Gaudiano, B. A. (2015) Treating depression in psychosis. In Incorporating acceptance and mindfulness into the treatment of psychosis: Current trends and future directions (pp. 81102). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Germer, C. K. & Siegel, R. D. (2012) Wisdom and compassion in psychotherapy. New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Germer, C. K. (2009) The mindful path to self-compassion: Freeing yourself from destructive thoughts and emotions. New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Gilbert, P. (2009) The compassionate mind. London: Constable & Robinson.Google Scholar
Gilbert, P. (2010). Compassion-focused therapy. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Gilbert, P. (2014) Mindful compassion: How the science of compassion can help you understand your emotions, live in the present, and connect deeply with others. Oakland, CA: Constable & Robinson.Google Scholar
Neff, K. (2011) Self-compassion. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
Tirch, D. D. & Gilbert, P. (2012) The compassionate-mind guide to overcoming anxiety. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
Welford, M. (2013) The power of self-compassion: Using compassion-focused therapy to end self-criticism and build self-confidence. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
Wright, N. P., Turkington, D., Kelly, O., Davies, D., Jacobs, A., & Hopton, J. (2014) Treating psychosis: A clinician's guide to integrating acceptance and commitment therapy, compassion-focused therapy & mindfulness approaches within the cognitive behavioral therapy tradition. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.Google Scholar

Links to Other Chapters

Compassion-focused approaches are woven through the chapters in the book. They can be used to reduce distress associated with stigma and trauma, including the experience of distressing beliefs, voices and visions. Compassion-focused approaches can be used to notice and address worry, rumination and avoidance. Compassion-focused approaches can be used to deal with stress and reduce triggers, catastrophic appraisals and social isolation. Compassion can influence our thinking, belief development and beliefs about the future. Through connection/affiliation and soothing, social defeat and negative symptoms can be reduced. This can then enhance drive/motivation and the ability to engage in meaningful goals. Finally, compassion-focused approaches can be used to have a powerful positive effect on the individual experiencing psychosis, their family and carers, the health care system and ultimately society.

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