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Chapter 9 - Caring about Delusions and Unusual Beliefs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2018

Douglas Turkington
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University
Helen M. Spencer
Affiliation:
Northumberland, Tyne & Wear NHS Foundation Trust
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Summary

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Back to Life, Back to Normality
CBT Informed Recovery for Families with Relatives with Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses
, pp. 59 - 64
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

Reference

Samarasekara, N., Kingdon, D., Siddle, R., et al. (2007). Befriending patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia: Can psychotic symptoms predict treatment response? Psychology and Psychotherapy, 80(1), 97106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

And on the following websites:

1. Paranoidthoughts.com

2. Psychosisresearch.com

Freeman, D., Freeman, J. & Garety, P. (2006). Overcoming paranoid & suspicious thoughts: A self-help guide using cognitive behavioural techniques. London: Constable & Robinson Ltd.Google Scholar
Morrison, A., Renton, J., French, P. & Bentall, R. (2008). Think you're crazy? Think again: A resource book for cognitive therapy for psychosis. East Sussex: Routledge.Google Scholar
Turkington, D. et al. (2009). Back to life, back to normality: Cognitive therapy, recovery and psychosis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Links to Other Chapters

It can be useful to look at worry and rumination (see Chapter 3) and also to undertake some compassionate mind exercises (see Chapter 12).

In relation to homework and looking for evidence, it might be useful to refer to Chapter 10 and Chapter 11.

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