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4 - Australia and Asia: A View From Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2024

James Cotton
Affiliation:
University of Tasmania
John Ravenhill
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
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Summary

Australians visiting Europe often complain about how little they see or hear of their own country in the European media. On the face of it, there is much to justify these reactions. It is exasperating to turn the pages of British newspapers and read the trivia they contain when one knows of the much more reportable, entertaining or significant stories they could print about other parts of the world. But is the situation much better when viewed in reverse? Are not the Australian media as guilty of parochialism when it comes to coverage of the outside world? The sad but very basic fact of the matter is that all politics are local politics. All of us who specialise in international affairs have been frustrated by the leverage of local issues on the attention of politicians, journalists, other academics and public opinion. We, when all is said and done, focus on issues such as whether certain countries will continue to exist, or whether the world will be at peace or war in months or years ahead. Sadly, these topics compete poorly with less vital topics such as the love lives of the Royal family or tales of petty corruption, both in Britain and in Australia.

Type
Chapter
Information
Australia in World Affairs 1991–1995
Seeking Asian Engagement
, pp. 33 - 43
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
First published in: 2024

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