Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-k7p5g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T13:25:18.788Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

40 - Anticipating Operational Naval Warfare Issues in International Humanitarian Law That May Arise in the Event of a Conflict in the South China Sea

from Part V - Looking to the Future and Enhancing Compliance with International Humanitarian Law

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2019

Suzannah Linton
Affiliation:
Zhejiang Gongshang University, China
Tim McCormack
Affiliation:
University of Tasmania
Sandesh Sivakumaran
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Get access

Summary

On 14 March 1988, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army – Navy (PLA-N) and Vietnamese maritime units engaged in a naval battle in the vicinity of Johnson South Reef in the Spratly Islands. Whilst reports vary, between sixty-four and seventy Vietnamese soldiers and sailors were killed, eleven wounded, and two Vietnamese vessels sunk. Nine Vietnamese soldiers taken prisoner during the engagement were held by the Chinese for more than three years, being released in September 1991. One Chinese sailor was wounded. In the long and complicated history of the China–Vietnam dispute in the South China Sea, and this incident was, by any measure, a clear political punctuation mark. It was also an international armed conflict (IAC), notable from a legal perspective mainly as an example of the oft-forgotten potential for maritime IACs to be short, sharp, localised and ‘done’ in a day.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×