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8 - The State and Development in Malaysia

Race, Class and Markets

from Part II - Cases of State Transformation in Contemporary Asia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2017

Toby Carroll
Affiliation:
City University of Hong Kong
Darryl S. L. Jarvis
Affiliation:
The Education University of Hong Kong
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Asia after the Developmental State
Disembedding Autonomy
, pp. 201 - 236
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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