Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-8kt4b Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-24T17:39:31.502Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

4 - The New Japan-ASEAN Partnership: Challenges in the Transformation of the Regional Context in East Asia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2015

Mie Oba
Affiliation:
Tokyo University of Science
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

The Japan-ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) partnership has a long history, beginning in the early 1970s. Japan began to have an informal dialogue with ASEAN in 1973 in order to resolve trade frictions over synthetic rubber. Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda proposed the Fukuda Doctrine and stressed the necessity of “heart-to-heart”, “person-to-person” understanding when he was invited to the second ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur in August 1977. Japan played an important role in the process of trying to find a resolution to the prolonged internal conflict in Cambodia, and contributed to reconstructing the country. After the 1997–98 Asian Financial Crisis, Japan's presence was evident in the various projects and plans to help crisis-hit countries overcome their problems as well as revitalize their economies. For example, the New Miyazawa Plan (1998), which was a package of financial assistance directed toward Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea (ROK), and Indonesia, was financed by Japan. In the early 1990s, Japan and ASEAN institutionalized the Meeting of ASEAN Economic Ministers and Minister for International Trade and Industry (AEM-MITI). AEM-MITI focused on economic cooperation between ASEAN and Japan, including assistance for Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, and Lao PDR) and Myanmar, with the aim of supporting these countries’ aspirations to be members of ASEAN. In addition, economic ministers of ASEAN countries and Japan agreed to establish the Cambodia-Laos-Myanmar Working Group, which aimed at narrowing the developmental gap in Southeast Asia, at the AEMMITI meeting held in September 1994. ASEAN economic cooperation actually began with an agreement between ASEAN economic ministers in 1992 to establish the ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA). After this, Japan-ASEAN industrial cooperation started encouraging greater integration and development in Southeast Asia. The Japan-ASEAN partnership carried a heavy weight for ASEAN countries because of Japan's position as the second-largest economic power in the world.

However, several new trends in East Asia since the beginning of the 21st century led Japan to rethink and reconstruct the Japan-ASEAN partnership. The rise of China, the acceleration of ASEAN integration, and the rapid development of ASEAN-centered regional architecture transformed economic circumstances in East Asia. These trends are interconnected with each other and have transformed the regional economic landscape of East Asia, significantly changing the character of the Japan-ASEAN partnership.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×