Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-59m7g Total loading time: 1.469 Render date: 2022-06-30T20:48:51.381Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Yafa Shanneik
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
The Art of Resistance in Islam
The Performance of Politics among Shi'i Women in the Middle East and Beyond
, pp. 219 - 241
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abdesselem, Mohamed. Le thème de la mort dans la poésie arabe: des origines à la fin du IIIe-IXe siècle. Tunis: Université de Tunis, 1977.Google Scholar
Abdo, Geneive. The New Sectarianism: The Arab Uprising and the Rebirth of the Shia-Sunni Divide. Oxford: Oxford Scholarship Online, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abedinpoor, Vahid, and Samaei, Masoomeh. “Theoretical Review of the Concept of ‘Shiite Art’ Emphasizing the Study of Shiite Approaches in the Timurid Era Architecture.” History of Islam and Iran 29, no. 42 (2019): 101126.Google Scholar
Abid, Lise Jamila. “Muslims in Austria: Integration through Participation in Austrian Society.” Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 26, no. 2 (2006): 263278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abu-Lughod, Lila. “Islam and the Gendered Discourses of Death.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 25, no. 2 (1993): 187205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abu-Lughod, Lila. “The Romance of Resistance: Tracing Transformations of Power through Bedouin Women.” American Ethnologist 17, no. 1 (1990): 4155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abu-Lughod, Lila. Writing Women’s Worlds: Bedouin Stories. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Abu-Lughod, Lila. “Zones of Theory in the Anthropology of the Arab World.” Annual Review of Anthropology 18, no. 1 (1989): 267306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Afary, Janet. Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism, edited by Anderson, Kevin and Foucault, Michel. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Afary, Janet. “Shiʿi Narratives of Karbala and Christian Rites of Penance: Michel Foucault and the Culture of the Iranian Revolution, 1978–1979.” Radical History Review 86 (2003): 735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Afary, Janet. “Shiʿite Narratives of Karbala and Christian Rites of Penance: Michel Foucault and the Culture of the Iranian Revolution, 1978–79.” In Eternal Performance: Taʿziyeh and Other Shiite Rituals, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 192236. London: Seagull, 2010.Google Scholar
Afzaltousi, Effatolsadat, and Mani, Nasim. “Sangabs (Lavers) of Isfahan: The Sacred Shia Art.” Bagh-i-Nazar 10, no. 27 (2014): 4960.Google Scholar
Aghaie, Kamran. “The Karbala Narrative: Shīʿī Political Discourse in Modern Iran in the 1960s and 1970s.” Journal of Islamic Studies 12, no. 2 (2001): 151176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aghaie, Kamran Scott. The Martyrs of Karbala: Shiʿi Symbols and Rituals in Modern Iran. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004.Google Scholar
Aghaie, Kamran Scott. The Women of Karbala: Ritual Performance and Symbolic Discourses in Modern Shiʿi Islam. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ajami, Fouad. The Vanished Imam: Musa al-Sadr and the Shiʿa of Lebanon. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1986.Google Scholar
Albloshi, Hamad H.Sectarianism and the Arab Spring: The Case of the Kuwaiti Shia.” The Muslim World 106, no. 1 Special Issue: “Overcoming Sectarian Faultlines after the Arab Uprisings: Sources, Symptoms and Solutions” (2016): 109126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ali, Nadje al-, and Koser, Khalid. “Transnationalism, International Migration and Home.” In New Approaches to Migration? Transnational Communities and the Transformation of Home, edited by al-Ali, Nadje and Koser, Khalid, 114. London: Routledge, 2002.Google Scholar
Allawi, Ali A. The Occupation of Iraq: Winning the War, Losing the Peace. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Allen, Amy. The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Allievi, Stefano. “The Muslim Community in Italy.” In Muslim Communities in the New Europe, edited by Nonneman, Gerd, Niblock, Tim, and Szajkowski, Bogdan, 315327. Reading, PA: Ithaca Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Altorki, Sorya, and El-Solh, Camillia Fawzi, eds. Arab Women in the Field: Studying Your Own Society. New York: Syracuse University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Amir-Moezzi, Mohammad. The Divine Guide in Early Shiʿism: The Sources of Esotericism in Islam, translated by Streight, David. New York: State University of New York Press, 1994.Google Scholar
And, Metin. “Muharram Observances in Anatolian Turkey.” In Taʿziyeh: Ritual and Drama in Iran, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 238254. New York: New York University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1983.Google Scholar
Anderson, Benedict. Long-Distance Nationalism: World Capitalism and the Rise of Identity Politics. Amsterdam: CASA, 1992.Google Scholar
Anjum, Ovamir. “Islam as a Discursive Tradition: Talal Asad and His Interlocutors.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 27, no. 3 (2007): 656672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ansari, Humayun. “The Infidel Within”: Muslims in Britain since 1800. London: C. Hurst, 2004.Google Scholar
Anvar, Iraj. “A Study of Peripheral Taʿziyeh in Iran.” PhD Dissertation. New York University, 1991.Google Scholar
Appadurai, Arjun. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Asaad, Sondoss al-. “Bahrain’s Ayatollah Qassim Treated in London.” en.mehrnews.com/news/135714/Bahrain-s-Ayatollah-Qassim-treated-in-LondonGoogle Scholar
Asad, Talal. “Agency and Pain: An Exploration.” Culture and Religion 1, no. 1 (2000): 2960.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Asad, Talal. “A Comment on Aijaz Ahmad’s In Theory.” Public Culture 6, no. 1 (1993): 3139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Asad, Talal. Genealogies of Religion: Discipline and Reasons of Power in Christianity and Islam. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Asad, Talal. The Idea of an Anthropology of Islam. Occasional Papers Series. Washington, DC: Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, Georgetown University, 1986.Google Scholar
Asad, Talal. “Notes on the Body, Pain and Truth in Medieval Christian Ritual.” Economy and Society 12, no. 1 (1983): 287327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Auga, Ulrike. “Decolonizing Public Space: A Challenge of Bonhoeffer’s and Spivak’s Concepts of Resistance, ‘Religion’ and ‘Gender’.” Feminist Theology 24, no. 1 (2015): 4968.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ayoub, Mahmoud Mustafa. The Crisis of Muslim History. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oneworld, 2005.Google Scholar
Ayoub, Mahmoud Mustafa. Redemptive Suffering in Islam: A Study of the Devotional Aspects of ‘Ashura’ in Twelver Shiʿism. The Hague: Mouton, 1978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bader, Veit. “The Governance of Islam in Europe: The Perils of Modelling.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 33, no. 6 (2007): 871886.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baktash, Mayel. “Taʿziyeh and Its Philosophy.” In Taʿziyeh: Ritual and Drama in Iran, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 95120. New York: New York University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Bargu, Banu. Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Bargu, Banu. “Why Did Bouazizi Burn Himself? The Politics of Fate and Fatal Politics.” Constellations 23, no. 1 (2016): 2736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Basch, Linda G., Schiller, Nina Glick, and Blanc, Cristina Szanton. Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States. Langhorne, PA: Gordon and Breach, 1993.Google Scholar
Bauman, Richard. “Poetics and Performance as Critical Perspectives on Language and Social Life.” Annual Review of Anthropology 19 (1990): 5988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bautista, Julius. “Hesukristo Superstar: Entrusted Agency and Passion Rituals in the Roman Catholic Philippines.” Australian Journal of Anthropology 28 (2017): 152164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beaugrand, Claire. Stateless in the Gulf: Migration, Nationality and Society in Kuwait. London: I. B. Tauris, 2013.Google Scholar
Beck, Lois, and Keddie, Nikki, eds. Women in the Muslim World. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beeman, William O.Cultural Dimensions of Performance Conventions in Iranian Taʿzieh.” In Taʿzieh: Ritual and Drama in Iran, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 2431. New York: New York University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Beinhauer-Köhler, Bärbel. Fatima Bint Muhammad: Metamorphosen einer frühislamischen Frauengestalt. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2002.Google Scholar
Bell, Catherine M. Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Benjamin, Walter. One-Way Street and Other Writings. London: Penguin, 1979.Google Scholar
Benjamin, Walter. The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Scottsdale, AZ: Prism Key Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Benyoussef, Lamia. “Gender and the Fractured Mythscapes of National Identity in Revolutionary Tunisia.” In Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions, edited by Hasso, Frances S. and Salime, Zakia, 5179. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bezirgan, Basima Qattan, and Fernea, Elizabeth W.. Middle Eastern Muslim Women Speak. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Bigliardi, Stefano. “Above Analysis and Amazement: Some Contemporary Muslim Characterizations of ‘Miracle’ and Their Interpretation.” Sophia 53, no. 1 (2013): 113129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bigliardi, Stefano. “The Interpretation of Miracles according to Mutahhari and Golshani: Comparative and Critical Notes.” Journal of Shiʿa Islamic Studies 6, no. 3 (2013): 261288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bilge, Sirma. “Beyond Subordination vs. Resistance: An Intersectional Approach to the Agency of Veiled Muslim Women.” Journal of Intercultural Studies 31, no. 1 (2010): 928.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blomfield, Bridget. “The Heart of Lament: Pakistani-American Muslims Women’s Azadari Rituals.” In Eternal Performance: Taʿziyeh and Other Shiite Rituals, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 380398. London: Seagull, 2010.Google Scholar
Blum, Stephen. “Compelling Reasons to Sing: The Music of Taziyeh.” Drama Review 49, no. 4 (2005): 8690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boddy, Janice. Wombs and Alien Spirits: Women, Men, and the Zar Cult in Northern Sudan. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Bøe, Marianne, and Flaskerud, Ingvild. “A Minority in the Making: The Shia Muslim Community in Norway.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 179197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bos, Matthijs van den.European Shiism? Counterpoints from Shiites’ Organization in Britain and the Netherlands.” Ethnicities 12, no. 5 (2012): 556580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre. Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre. “The Forms of Capital.” In Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education, edited by Richardson, John G., 241258. New York: Greenwood, 1986.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre. Language and Symbolic Power. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre. Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre, and Wacquant, Loic J. D. An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1992.Google Scholar
Briggs, Charles. “‘Since I Am a Woman, I Will Chastise My Relatives’ – Gender, Reported Speech, and the (Re)Production of Social Relations in Warao Ritual Wailing.” American Ethnologist 19, no. 2 (1992): 337361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brinkerhoff, Jennifer M. Digital Diasporas: Identity and Transnational Engagement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burridge, Kenelm. New Heaven, New Earth: A Study of Millenarian Activities. New York: Schocken Books, 1969.Google Scholar
Butler, Judith. Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex. New York: Routledge, 1993.Google Scholar
Butler, Judith. Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative. New York: Routledge, 1997.Google Scholar
Butler, Judith. “Further Reflections on Conversations of Our Time.” Diacritics 27, no. 1 (1997): 1315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, 1999.Google Scholar
Butler, Judith. The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Butler, Judith, and Connolly, William. “Politics. Power and Ethics: A Discussion between Judith Butler and William Connolly.” Theory and Event 24, no. 2 (2000), muse.jhu.edu/issue/2220.Google Scholar
Calmard, Jean, and Calmard, Jacqueline. “Muharram Ceremonies Observed in Tehran by Ilya Nicolaevich Berezin.” In Eternal Performance: Taʿziyeh and Other Shiite Rituals, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 5473. London: Seagull, 2010.Google Scholar
Chatziprokopiou, Marios, and Hatziprokopiou, Panos. “Between the Politics of Difference and the Poetics of Similarity. Performing Ashura in Piraeus.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2 (2017): 198215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chau, Adam Yuet. “The Sensorial Production of the Social.” Ethnos 73, no. 4 (2008): 485504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter, ed. Eternal Performance: Taʿziyeh and Other Shiite Rituals. London: Seagull Books, 2010.Google Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter J.Iconography of the Women of Karbala: Tiles, Murals, Stamps and Posters.” In The Women of Karbala: Ritual Performance and Symbolic Discourses in Modern Shiʿi Islam, edited by Aghaie, Kamran Scot, 119138. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter. “Islam in Modern Drama and Theatre.” Die Welt des Islams 23–24 (1984): 4569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter J.No Access. From Karbala to New York City: Taziyeh on the Move.” Drama Review 49, no. 4 (T 188) (Winter 2005): 1214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter. “Taʿziyeh: Indigenous Avant-Garde Theatre of Iran.” Performing Arts Journal 2, no. 1 (1977): 3140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter, ed. Taʿziyeh: Ritual and Drama in Iran. New York: New York University Press 1979.Google Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter J.Time Out of Memory: Taʿziyeh, the Total Drama.” Drama Review 49, no. 4, Special Issue on Taʿziyeh (Winter 2005): 1527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter, with H. Dabashi. Staging a Revolution: The Art of Persuasion in the Islamic Republic of Iran. London: Booth-Clibborn Editions, 1999.Google Scholar
Chelkowski, Peter, and Korom., FrankCommunity Process and the Performance of Muharram Observances in Trinidad.” Drama Review 38, no. 2 (Summer 1994): 150175.Google Scholar
Chishti, Saʾim. Al-Batul (The Chaste Virgin). Faisalabad, Pakistan: Chishti Kutub Khaneh, 2005.Google Scholar
Christian, William A. Apparitions in Late Medieval and Renaissance Spain. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Christian, William A. Visionaries: The Spanish Republic and the Reign of Christ. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Connerton, Paul. How Societies Remember. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Corboz, Elvire. Guardians of Shiʿism: Sacred Authority and Transnational Family Networks. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015.Google Scholar
Csordas, Thomas J. Language, Charisma, and Creativity: The Ritual Life of a Religious Movement. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Csordas, Thomas J. The Sacred Self: A Cultural Phenomenology of Charismatic Healing. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Csordas, Thomas J.Somatic Modes of Attention.” Cultural Anthropology 8, no. 2 (1993): 135156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
D’Souza, Diane. Partners of Zaynab: A Gendered Perspective of Shia Muslim Faith. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dabashi, Hamid. Shiʿism: A Religion of Protest. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dabashi, Hamid. “Taʿziyeh as Theatre of Protest.” Drama Review 49, no. 4, Special Issue on Taʿziyeh (Winter 2005): 9199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dabashi, Hamid. “La Vita Nuda: Baring Bodies, Bearing Witness.” Al-Jazeera (January 23, 2012). www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2012/01/201212111238688792.htmlGoogle Scholar
Dakake, Maria Massi. The Charismatic Community: Shiʿite Identity in Early Islam. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Davis, Phillip W., and Boles, Jacqueline. “Pilgrim Apparition Work: Symbolization and Crowd Interaction. When the Virgin Mary Appeared in Georgia.” Georgia State University Journal of Contemporary Ethnography 32, no. 4 (August 2003): 371402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deeb, Laura. “‘Doing Good, Like Sayyida Zaynab’: Lebanese Shiʿi Women’s Participation in the Public Sphere.” In Social Practice, and Contested Hegemonies: Reconstructing the Public Sphere in Muslim Majority Societies, edited by Salvatore, Armando and LeVine, Mark, 85107. New York: Palgrave, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deeb, Laura. An Enchanted Modern: Gender and Public Piety in Shiʿi Lebanon. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deeb, Lara, and Harb, Mona. Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shiʿite South Beirut. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Deeb, Lara, and Harb, Mona. “Politics, Culture, Religion: How Hizbullah is Constructing an Islamic Milieu in Lebanon.” Review of Middle East Studies 43, no. 2 (2009): 198206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deeb, Lara, and Winegar, Jessica. “Anthropologies of Arab-Majority Societies.” Annual Review of Anthropology 41, no. 1 (2012): 537558.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Della Cava, Ralph, and Della Cava, John. Miracle at Joaseiro. New York: Columbia University Press, 1970.Google Scholar
Derrida, Jacques. “Signature Event Context.” In Limited Inc., 123. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Derrida, Jacques. Dissemination. Translated by Johnson, Barbara. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Desjarlais, Robert. “The Office of Reason: On the Politics of Language and Agency in a Shelter for ‘the Homeless Mentally Ill’.” American Ethnologist 23, no. 4 (1996): 880900.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Din, Karim Hussam el-.The Terminology and Notion of Madness in Arabic.” Alif: Journal of Comparative Poetics 14 (1994): 619.Google Scholar
Dirks, Nicholas B., Eley, Geoff, and Ortner, Sherry B.. Culture/Power/History: A Reader in Contemporary Social Theory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Dittmann, Andreas. “Pakistan.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 389404. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Dittmann, Andreas, and Staarmann, André. “Afghanistan.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 1328. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Dittmann, Andreas, and Staarmann, André. “Irak.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 151170. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Djebli, Moktar. “Nahdj al-Balagha.” In Encyclopaedia of lslam 7, 903904. Leiden: Brill, 1993.Google Scholar
Dogra, Sufyan Abid. “Living a Piety-Led Life beyond Muharram: Becoming or Being a South Asian Shia Muslim in the UK.” Contemporary Islam 13 (2019): 307324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dogra, Sufyan Abid. “Karbala in London: Battle of Expressions of Ashura Ritual Commemorations among Twelver Shia Muslims of South Asian Background.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 158178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Doran, Michael Scott. “The Heirs of Nasser: Who Will Benefit from the Second Arab Revolution?Foreign Affairs 90, no. 3 (2011): 1725.Google Scholar
Douglas, Mary. Natural Symbols. London: Routledge, 2003.Google Scholar
Dowling, William C. Jameson, Althusser, Marx: An Introduction to the Political Unconscious. London: Methuen, 1984.Google Scholar
Edgar, Iain R. The Dream in Islam: From Qur’anic Tradition to Jihadist Inspiration. New York: Berghahn Books, 2011.Google Scholar
Eileraas, Karina. “Sex(t)ing Revolution, Femen-izing the Public Square: Aliaa Magda Elmahdy, Nude Protest, and Transnational Feminist Body Politics.” Signs 40, no. 1 (2014): 4052.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eileraas, Karina. “Revolution Undressed: The Politics of Rage and Aesthetics in Aliaa Elmahdy’s Body Activism.” In Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions, edited by Hasso, Frances S. and Salime, Zakia, 167220. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Ende, Werner. “The Flagellations of Muharram and the Shiʿite ʿUlamaʾ.” Der Islam: Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur des Islamischen Orients 1, no. 55 (1978): 1936.Google Scholar
Esposti, Emanuelle Degli. “The Aesthetics of Ritual – Contested Identities and Conflicting Performances in the Iraqi Shiʿa Diaspora: Ritual, Performance and Identity Change.” Politics 38, no. 1 (2018): 6883.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fahmi, Wael Salah. “Bloggers’ Street Movement and the Right to the City: (Re)claiming Cairo’s Read and Virtual ‘Space of Freedom.’Environment and Urbanization 21, no. 1 (2009): 89107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fakhro, Munira A.The Uprising in Bahrain: An Assessment.” In The Persian Gulf at the Millennium: Essays in Politics, Economy, Security and Religion, edited by Potter, Lawrence G. and Sick, Gary, 167188. New York: St Martin’s Press 1997.Google Scholar
Fazaeli, Roja, and Künkler, Mirjam. “Of Alima, Vaizes, and Mujtahidas: New Opportunities for Old Role Models?” In Women, Leadership and Mosques, edited by Kalmbach, Hilary and Banoo, Masooda, 127161. Leiden: Brill, 2012.Google Scholar
Feola, Michael. “Speaking Subjects and Democratic Space: Rancière and the Politics of Speech.” Polity 46, no. 4 (2014): 498519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernea, Elizabeth W. Guests of the Sheikh: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. New York: Anchor Books, 1965.Google Scholar
Fernea, Elizabeth W.Remembering Taʿziyeh in Iraq.” Drama Review 49, no. 4, Special Issue on Taʿziyeh (Winter 2005): 130139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernea, Elizabeth W., and Bezirgan, Basima Q.. “Women’s Religious Rituals in Iraq.” In The Women of Karbala: Ritual Performance and Symbolic Discourses in Modern Shiʿi Islam, edited by Aghaie, Kamran Scot, 229240. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernea, Robert, and Fernea, Elizabeth W.. “Variations in Religious Observance among Islamic Women.” In Scholars, Saints, and Sufis in Muslim Religious Institutions in the Middle East since 1500, edited by Keddie, Nikki R., 385401. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Fibiger, Thomas B. “Ashura in Bahrain. Analysis of an Analytical Event.” Social Analysis 54, no. 3 (2010): 2946.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fibiger, Thomas B. “Sectarian Non-Entrepreneurs: The Experience of Everyday Sectarianism in Bahrain and Kuwait.” Middle East Critique 27, no. 3 (2018): 303316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fischer, Michael M. J. Iran: From Religious Dispute to Revolution. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild.Aruze Qasem: A Theatrical Event in Shiʿi Female Commemorative Rituals.” In People of the Prophet’s House, edited by Suleman, Fahmida, 202211. London: Islamic Publications. Azimuth Editions, 2015.Google Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild. “‘Oh, My Heart Is Sad. It Is Moharram, the Month of Zaynab’: The Role of Aesthetics and Women’s Mourning Ceremonies in Shiraz.” In The Women of Karbala: Ritual Performance and Symbolic Discourses in Modern Shiʿi Islam, edited by Aghaie, Kamran Scot, 6591. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild. “Representing Spiritual and Gendered Space. Challenges in Audio-visual Recording of Iranian Shia Women’s RitualsAnthropology of Contemporary Middle East and Central Eurasia 1, no. 1 (2013): 2142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild. “Ritual Creativity and Plurality: Denying Twelver Shia Blood-Let Practices.” In The Ambivalence of Denial: Danger and Appeal of Rituals, edited by Hüsken, Ute and Simon, Udo, 117143. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2016.Google Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild. “Visualizing Belief and Piety. Representation, Reception and Function of Imagery in Iranian Shiism.” PhD Dissertation, University of Bergen, 2008.Google Scholar
Flaskerud, Ingvild. “Women as Ritual Performers: Commemorating Martyrdom in Female Gender-Specific Rituals in Shia-Islamic Iran.” In Women and Religion in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, edited by Mahle, Ingvar B. and Okkenhaug, Inger Marie, 115134. Oslo: Unipub, 2004.Google Scholar
Foley, Kathy. “Eternal Performance: Taʿziyeh and Other Shiite Rituals. Edited by. Peter Chelkowski (Review).” Asian Theatre Journal 31, no. 1 (2014): 340342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Formichi, Chiara, and Feener, Michael. Shiʿism in South East Asia: Alid Piety and Sectarian Constructions. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. London: Peregrine Books, 1979.Google Scholar
Foucault, Michel. “The Subject and Power.” In Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, edited by Dreyfus, H. and Rabinow, P., 208226. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Foucault, Michel. Surveiller et Punir: Naissance de la Prison. Paris: Gallimard, 1975.Google Scholar
Foucault, Michel, “Truth and Power.” In Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972–1977, edited and translated by Gordon, C., 109133. New York: Pantheon Books, 1980.Google Scholar
Frishkopf, Michael. “Against Ethnomusicology: Language Performance and the Social Impact of Ritual Performance in Islam.” Performing Islam 2, no. 1 (2013): 1143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fuller, Graham E., and Francke, Rend Rahim. The Arab Shiʿa: The Forgotten Muslims. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Gerholm, Tomas, and Lithman, Yngve Georg, eds. The New Islamic Presence in Western Europe. London: Mansell Publishing, 1988.Google Scholar
Gholami, Reza. Secularism and Identity: Non-Islamiosity in the Iranian Diaspora. Farnham: Ashgate, 2015.Google Scholar
Ghorashi, Halleh, and Boersma, Kees. “The ‘Iranian Diaspora’ and the New Media: From Political Action to Humanitarian Help.” Development and Change 40, no. 4 (2009): 667691.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gieler, Wolfgang. “Bahrain.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 4962. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gieler, Wolfgang, and Wege, Sabine. Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilsenan, Michael. Recognizing Islam: Religion and Society in the Modern Middle East. London: I. B. Tauris, 1990.Google Scholar
Goluboff, Sascha L.Patriarchy through Lamentation in Azerbaijan.” American Ethnologist 35, no. 1 (2008): 8194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Good, Byron, and DelVecchio, Mary-Jo. “Ritual, the State and the Transformation of Emotional Discourse in Iranian Society.” Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry 12 (1988): 4363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goode, Erich. Collective Behavior. Fort Worth, TX: Saunders College Publishers, 1992.Google Scholar
Gouda, Vehia. Dreams and Their Meaning in the Old Arab Tradition. New York: Vantage Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Gramsci, Antonio. The Modern Prince and Other Writings. New York: International Publishers, 1957.Google Scholar
Griffith, R. Marie. God’s Daughters: Evangelical Women and the Power of Submission. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Grillo, Ralph. “Islam and Transnationalism.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 30, no. 5 (2004): 861878.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hacking, Ian. Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hadciz, Halima. Der Moslemische Sozialdienst. Vienna: Safinah, 2013.Google Scholar
Haddad, Fanar. “Sectarian Relations in Arab Iraq: Contextualising the Civil War of 2006–2007.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 40, no. 2 (2013): 115138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haddad, Kifah. Nisāʾ al-Ṭufūf [The Women Survivers of Karbala]. Karbala: Al-ʿAtaba al-Hussayniyya al-Muqadasa, 2011.Google Scholar
Hafez, Sherine, and Slyomovics, Susan, eds. Anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa: Into the New Millennium. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Haidari, Ibrahim al-. Trājīdiyyā Karbalā': Sūsyūlūjiyya al-Khiṭāb al-Shī`ī. London: Dar al-Saqi, 1999.Google Scholar
Haidari, Ibrahim al-. Zur Soziologie des schiitischen Chiliasmus. Ein Beitrag zur Erforschung des irakischen Passionsspiels. Freiburg im Breisgau: Klaus Schwarz, 1975.Google Scholar
Hale, Sondra. “Women’s Culture/Men’s Culture: Gender, Separation, and Space in Africa and North American.” American Behavioural Scientist 31, no. 1 (1986): 115134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hall, Linda B. Mary, Mother and Warrior: The Virgin in Spain and the Americas, edited by Eckmann, Teresa. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamilton, Peter. Emile Durkheim: Critical Assessments, edited by Hamilton, Peter. London: Routledge, 1995.Google Scholar
Hanks, William. “Text and Textuality.” Annual Review of Anthropology 18 (1989): 95127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harb, Mona. “Politics, Culture, Religion: How Hizbullah Is Constructing an Islamic Milieu in Lebanon.” Review of Middle East Studies 43, no. 2 (2009): 198206.Google Scholar
Harris, Ruth. “‘The Oil Is Sizzling in the Pot’: Sound and Emotion in Uyghur Qurʾanic Recitation.” Ethnomusicology Forum 23, no. 3 (2014): 331359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, Ruth. Lourdes: Body and Spirit in the Secular Age. London: Allen Lane, 1999.Google Scholar
Hasso, Frances S.The Sect–Sex–Police Nexus and Politics in Bahrain’s Pearl Revolution.” In Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions, edited by Hasso, Frances S. and Salime, Zakia, 105137. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hasso, Frances S., and Salime, Zakia, eds. Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Hegland, Mary Elaine. “Flagellation and Fundamentalism: (Trans)forming Meaning, Identity, and Gender through Pakistani Women’s Rituals of Mourning.” American Ethnologist 25, no. 2 (1998): 240266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hegland, Mary Elaine. “Political Roles of Iranian Village Women.” MERIP Middle East Report 16, no. 10 (1986): 1419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hegland, Mary Elaine. “The Power Paradox in Muslim Women’s Majales: North-West Pakistani Mourning Rituals as Sites of Contestation over Religious Politics, Ethnicity, and Gender.” Signs 23, no. 2 (1988): 391428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hegland, Mary Elaine. “Ritual and Revolution in Iran.” In Political Anthropology Volume II: Culture and Political Change, edited by Arnoff, Myron J., 75100. Piscataway, NJ: Transaction Books, 1983.Google Scholar
Hegland, Mary Elaine. “Shi’a Women’s Rituals in Northwest Pakistan: The Shortcomings and Significance of Resistance.” Anthropological Quarterly 76, no. 3 (Summer 2003): 411442CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heller, Kevin Jon.Power, Subjectification and Resistance in Foucault.” SubStance 23, no. 1 (1996): 78110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hermansen, Marcia. “Dreams and Dreaming in Islam.” In Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming, edited by Bulkeley, Kelly, 7392. New York: Palgrave, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hermansen, Marcia K.Fatimah as a Role Model in the Works of Ali Shari’ati.” In Women and Revolution in Iran, edited by Nashat, Guity. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1983.Google Scholar
Hesse-Lehmann, Karin, and Spellman, Kathryn. “Iranische Transnationale Religiöse Institutionen in London und Hamburg.” In Zuwanderung und Integration: Kulturwissenschaftliche Zugänge und soziale Praxis, edited by Köck, Christoph, Moosmüller, Alois, and Roth, Klaus, 141162. Münster: Waxmann, 2004.Google Scholar
Hirschkind, Charles. The Ethical Soundscape: Cassette Sermons and Islamic Counterpublics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Hirschkind, Charles. “Technologies of Islamic Piety: Cassette-Sermons and the Ethics of Listening.” PhD Dissertation, Johns Hopkins University, 1999.Google Scholar
Holm Pedersen, Marianne. Iraqi Women in Denmark: Ritual Performance and Belonging in Everyday Life. Manchester: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.Google Scholar
Howarth, Toby. “The Pulpit of Tears: Shiʿa Muslim Preaching in India.” PhD Dissertation. Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, 2001.Google Scholar
Hsu, Elisabeth. “Acute Pain Infliction as Therapy.” Etnofoor 18, no. 1 (2005): 7896, 188–207.Google Scholar
Hubert, Henri, and Mauss, Marcel. Sacrifice: Its Nature and Functions. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1964.Google Scholar
Hudaid, Nada al-. “Karamah (‘Marvel’): An Exploration of the Literal and Ethnographic Meaning of Miracles among Shiʿa Female Artists in Kuwait.” World Art 10, no. 1 (2020): 145159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Human Rights Watch. “Bahrain: Hundreds Stripped of Citizenship: Bahrainis Deported from Homeland” (2018). www.hrw.org/news/2018/07/27/bahrain-hundreds-stripped-citizenshipGoogle Scholar
Humayuni, Sadeq. “An Analysis of the Taʿziyeh of Qasem.” In Taʿziyeh, Ritual and Drama in Iran, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 1223. New York: New York University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Husseini, Rola el-, and Leichtman, Mara. “Arab Shiʿism and the Shiʿa of Lebanon: New Approaches to Modern History, Contemporary Politics, and Religion.” Welt des Islams 59, no. 3–4 (2019): 253281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hyder, Syed Akbar. Reliving Karbala: Martyrdom in South Asia Memory. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Ijli, Shumran al-. Al-Khariṭa al-Siyāsiyya f ī al-Muʿāraḍa al-ʿIrāqiyya. London: Dar al-Hikma, 2002.Google Scholar
Jazaʾiri, Nur al-Din, Khaṣaʼiṣ al-Zaynabiyya. Qom: Intishārāt al-Sharīf al-Riḍā, 1998.Google Scholar
Kadhum, Oula. “Diasporic Interventions: State-Building in Iraq Following the 2003 Iraq War.” PhD Dissertation, Warwick University, 2017.Google Scholar
Kadhum, Oula. “Unpacking the Role of Religion in Political Transnationalism: The Case of the Shiʿa Iraqi Diaspora since 2003.” International Affairs 96, no. 2 (2020): 305322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kadhum, Oula. “Where Politics and Temporality Meet: Shiʿa Political Transnationalism over Time and Its Relationship to the Iraqi State.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (2020): 7–45, https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2020.1814128CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kalinock, Sabine. “Supernatural Intercession to Earthly Problems: Sofreh Rituals among Shiite Muslims and Zoroastrians in Iran.” In Zoroastrian Rituals in Context, edited by Stausberg, Michael, 531546. Leiden: Brill, 2004.Google Scholar
Kanafani, Samar, and Sawaf, Zina. “Being, Doing and Knowing in the Field: Reflections on Ethnographic Practice in the Arab Region.” Contemporary Levant 2, no. 1 (2017): 311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kandiyoti, Deniz. “Bargaining with Patriarchy.” Gender and Society 2 (1988): 274290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kapaló, James Alexander. Text, Context and Performance: Gagauz Folk Religion in Discourse and Practice. Leiden: Brill, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kapchan, Deborah.Learning to Listen: The Sound of Sufism in France.” In The World of Music, 6589. London: Routledge, 2009.Google Scholar
Kapchan, DeborahSinging Community/Remembering in Common: Sufi Liturgy and North African Identity in Southern France.” International Journal of Community Music 2, no. 1 (2009): 923.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kazimi, Faysal Khalid al-. Al-Minbar al-Ḥusaynī. Beirut: Dar wa-Maktabat al-Hilal, 2004.Google Scholar
Keddie, Nikki R. Debating Revolutions. London: New York University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Keddie, Nikki R. Modern Iran: Roots and Results of Revolution. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
Keddie, Nikki R. Roots of Revolution: An Interpretive History of Modern Iran. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Keddie, Nikki R., and Hooglund, E., eds. The Iranian Revolution and the Islamic Republic. New ed. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, [1982] 1986.Google Scholar
Kertzer, David. Ritual, Politics and Power. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Khairallah, As’ad E. Love, Madness, and Poetry: An Interpretation of the Magnun Legend. Beirut: Franz Steiner, 1980.Google Scholar
Khalili, Laleh. Heroes and Martyrs of Palestine: The Politics of National Commemoration. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khosronejad, Pedram. “Anthropology of Islamic Shiʿite Art and Material Culture.” Anthropology News 47, no. 6 (2006), 3333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khosronejad, Pedram. The Art and Material Culture of Iranian Shiʿism. London: I. B. Tauris in association with Iran Heritage Foundation, 2014.Google Scholar
Khosronejad, Pedram. The Art and Material Culture of Iranian Shiʿism: Iconography and Religious Devotion in Shiʿi Islam. London: I. B. Tauris, 2012.Google Scholar
Khudari, Dakhil al-Sayyid al-. Muʿjam al-Khutabā’ 7. Beirut: Al-Muʾassasa al-ʿĀlamiyya li-l-Thaqāfa wa-l-Iʿlām, 1991.Google Scholar
Khuri, Fuad. Tribe and State in Bahrain. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Kirbasi, Muhammad Sadiq al-. Muʿjam Khuṭabāʾ al-Minbar al-Ḥusaynī. London: Husseini Centre for Research, 1999.Google Scholar
Klemm, Verena. “Image Formation of an Islamic Legend: Fatima, the Daughter of the Prophet Muhammad.” in Ideas, Images and Methods of Portrayal. Insights into Classical Arabic Literature and Islam, edited by Günther, Sebastian, 181208. Leiden: Brill, 2005.Google Scholar
Kousari, Masoud. “The Shiite Art in Iran.” Sociological Journal of Art and Literature 3, no. 1 (2012): 736.Google Scholar
Kraidy, Marwan M. Reality Television and Arab Politics: Contention in Public Life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kraidy, Marwan M.The Revolutionary Body Politic: Preliminary Thoughts on a Neglected Medium in the Arab Uprisings.” Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication 5, no. 2 (2012): 472483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kroissenbrunner, Sabine.Islam and Muslim Immigrants in Austria: Socio-Political Networks and Muslim Leadership of Turkish Immigrants.” Immigrants and Minorities 22, nos. 2–3 (2003): 188207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kropp, Louisa Sofie, and Geringer, Natalja. “Saudi Arabia.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 417434. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Laitin, David D. Hegemony and Culture: Politics and Religious Change among the Yoruba. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1986.Google Scholar
Lambert, Lake. Spirituality: Religion in the American Workplace. New York: New York University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Langer, Robert, and Weineck, Benjamin. “Shiite ‘Communities of Practice’ in Germany: Researching Multi-Local, Heterogeneous Actors in Transnational Space.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 216240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Larsson, Göran, and Thurfjell, David. Shia muslimer i Sverige: En kortfattad översikt. Nämnden för statligt stöd till trossamfunds (SST) skriftserie 3. Stockholm: SST:s Skriftserie Nr. 3, 2013. www.myndighetensst.se/download/18.373f439f14832abd2cf2d9a9/1409663377272/Nr%203,%20Shia-muslimer%20i%20Sverige_komplett.pdfGoogle Scholar
Lassotta, Wolf-Dieter, and Vahle, Schirin. “Lebanon.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 305316. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Lassotta, Wolf-Dieter, and Schwarz, Martin. “Syria.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 471488. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Lechkar, Iman. “Being a ‘True’ Shiʿite: The Poetics of Emotions among Belgian-Moroccan Shiites.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 241259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leichtman, Mara. Shiʿi Cosmopolitanisms in Africa: Lebanese Migration and Religious Conversion in Senegal. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2015.Google Scholar
Lofland, John. “Collective Behavior: The Elementary Forms.” In Social Psychology: Sociological Perspectives, edited by Osenberg, M. and Turner, R. H., 411446. New York: Basic Books, 1981.Google Scholar
Lofland, John. Protest: Studies of Collective Behaviour and Social Movements. New York: Routledge, 1985.Google Scholar
Longva, Anh Nga. “Nationalism in Pre-Modern Guise: The Discourse on Hadhar and Badu in Kuwait.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 38 (2006): 171187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Longva, Anh Nga. Walls Built on Sand: Migration, Exclusion and Society in Kuwait. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Louër, Laurence. “Sectarianism and Coup-Proofing Strategies in Bahrain.” Journal of Strategic Studies 36, no. 2 (2013): 245260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Louër, Laurence. “The Political Impact of Labor Migration in Bahrain.” City & Society 20, no. 1 (2008): 3253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Louër, Laurence. Transnational Shia Politics: Religious and Political Networks in the Gulf. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Lutz, Catherine, and White, Geoffrey. “The Anthropology of Emotions.” Annual Review of Anthropology 15 (1986):405436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyon, Margot and Barbalet, Jack, “Society’s Body: Emotion and the ‘Somatization’ of Social Theory.” In Embodiment and Experience: The Existential Ground of Culture and Self, edited by Csordas, Thomas J., 4866. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Machlis, Elisheva. “Al-Wefaq and the February 14 Uprising: Islam, Nationalism and Democracy – The Shiʿi-Bahraini Discourse.” Middle Eastern Studies 52, no. 6 (2016): 978995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacLeod, Arlene Elowe. Accommodating Protest: Working Women, the New Veiling and Change in Cairo. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Maffesoli, Michel. The Contemplation of the World: Figures of Community Style. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Mahler, Sarah J., and Pessar, Patricia R.. “Gendered Geographies of Power: Analyzing Gender across Transnational Spaces.” Identities 7, no. 4 (2014): 441459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mahmood, Saba. Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2005.Google Scholar
Majlisi, Muhammad Baqir al-. Biḥār al-Anwār. 110 vols. Tehran: al-Maktaba al-Islamiyya, 1966.Google Scholar
Mamdani, Mahmood. Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War, and the Roots of Terror. New York: Pantheon, 2004.Google Scholar
Mangiapan, Theodore. Lourdes: Miraculous Cures. 3rd ed. Lourdes: Lourdes Medical Bureau, 1993.Google Scholar
Marei, Fouad Gehad. “From the Throes of Anguished Mourning: Shiʿi Ritual Lamentation and the Pious Publics of Lebanon.” Religion and Society: Advances in Research 11 (2020): 133147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marei, Fouad Gehad, and Shanneik, Yafa. “Lamenting Karbala in Europe: Husayni Liturgy and Discourses of Dissent amongst Diasporic Bahraini and Lebanese Shiis.” Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations 32, no. 1 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1080/09596410.2020.1827341CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Margry, Peter Jan.Marian Interventions in the Wars of Ideology: The Elastic Politics of the Roman Catholic Church on Modern Apparitions.” History and Anthropology 20, no. 3 (2009): 243263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matter, E. Ann.Apparitions of the Virgin Mary in the Late Twentieth Century: Apocalyptic, Representation, Politics.” Religion 31, no. 2 (2001): 125153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matthiesen, Toby. “Mysticism, Migration and Clerical Networks: Ahmad al-Ahsaʾi and the Shaykhis of al-Ahsa, Kuwait and Basra.” Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 34, no. 4 (2014): 386409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matthiesen, Toby. Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn’t. Stanford, CA: Stanford Briefs, An Imprint of Stanford University Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McAdam, Doug, McCarthy, John D., and Zald, Mayer N.. Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements: Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures, and Cultural Framings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McAuliffe, Cameron. “A Home Far Away? Religious Identity and Transnational Relations in the Iranian Diaspora.” Global Networks 7, no. 3 (2007): 307327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McAuliffe, Cameron. “Transnationalism Within: Internal Diversity in the Iranian Diaspora.” Australian Geographer 39, no. 1 (2008): 6380.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mdaires, Falah al-. Islamic Extremism in Kuwait: From the Muslim Brotherhood to Al-Qaeda and Other Islamic Political Groups. New York: Routledge, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meade, Everard. The Eagle and the Virgin: Nation and Cultural Revolution in Mexico, 1920–1940, edited by Vaughan, Mary Kay and Lewis, Stephen E.. Durham, NC: Wiley-Blackwell, 2006.Google Scholar
Mervin, Sabrina, ed. The Shiʿa Worlds and Iran. London: Saqi, 2010.Google Scholar
Mess, Markus. “Yemen.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 223232. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Meyer, Birgit, ed. Aesthetic Formations: Media, Religion, and the Senses. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, Birgit. “Aesthetics of Persuasion: Global Christianity and Pentecostalism’s Sensational Forms.” South Atlantic Quarterly 109, no. 4 (2010): 741763.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mirshahvalad, Minoo. “How an Italian Amorphous Space Became a Twelver Shiʿa Mosque.” Working Papers Series 5 (2018): 105128.Google Scholar
Mitchell, John P. “‘Performing Statues.’” In Religion and Material Culture: The Matter of Belief, edited by Morgan, David, 262276. Abingdon: Routledge, 2010.Google Scholar
Mittermaier, Amira. “Dreams and the Miraculous.” In A Companion to the Anthropology of the Middle East, edited by Altorki, Sorya, 107124. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015.Google Scholar
Mittermaier, Amira. “How to Do Things with Examples: Sufis, Dreams, and Anthropology.” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 21, S. 1 (2015): 129143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mittermaier, Amira. “(Re)Imagining Space: Dreams and Saint Shrines in Egypt.” In Dimensions of Locality: Muslims Saints, Their Place and Space, edited by Stauth, G. and Schielke, S., 4766. Bielefeld: Transcript, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Momen, Moojan. An Introduction to Shiʿa Islam: The History and Doctrines of Twelver Shiʿism. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Morinis, Alan. “The Ritual Experience: Pain and the Transformation of Consciousness in Ordeals of Initiation.” Ethos 13, no. 2 (1985): 150175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mottahedeh, Roy. The Mantle of the Prophet. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1985.Google Scholar
Mufid, al Shaykh al-. Al-Irshād fī Maʿrifat Hijaj Allāh ʿalā al-ʿIbād 2. Beirut: Dar al-Mufid, 1993.Google Scholar
Munoz-Perez, Bruno, and Zarouni, Mohammed. “United Arab Emirates.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 557566. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Nadav, Safran. Saudi Arabia: The Ceaseless Quest for Security. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Nakash, Yitzhak. “An Attempt to Trace the Origin of the Rituals of ʿAshuraʾ.” Die Welt Des Islams 33 (1993): 161181.Google Scholar
Nakash, Yitzhak. “The Shiʿites and the Future of Iraq.” Foreign Affairs 82, no. 4 (July–August 2003): 1726.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nakash, Yitzhak. Reaching for Power: The Shiʿa in the Modern Arab World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Nakash, Yitzhak. The Shiis of Iraq. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Nakib, Farah al-. “Revisiting Hadar and Badu in Kuwait: Citizenship, Housing and the Construction of a Dichotomy.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 46 (2014): 530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. Islam and the Plight of Modern Man. London: Longman, 1975.Google Scholar
Nasr, Vali. The Shiʿa Revival: How Conflicts within Islam Will Shape the Future. London: Norton, 2007.Google Scholar
Newman, Andrew. “The Art and Material Culture of Iranian Shiʿism: Iconography and Religious Devotion in Shiʿi Islam edited by Pedram Khosronejad.” Journal of Shiʿa Islamic Studies 6, no. 4 (2013): 486491.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newman, Andrew. Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire. London: I. B. Tauris, 2008.Google Scholar
Niedźwiedź, Anna Obraz i postać. Znaczenia wizerunku Matki Boskiej Częstochowskiej. Kraków: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, 2005.Google Scholar
Nielsen, Jørgen. Towards a European Islam. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nora, Pierre. “Between Memory and History: ‘Les lieux de mémoire.’Representations 26, no. 7 (1989): 724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norton, Richard. “Ritual, Blood, and Shiite Identity: Ashura in Nabatiyya, Lebanon.” Drama Review, Special Issue on Ta‘zieh 49, no. 4 (2005): 140155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Obeyesekere, Gananth. Medusa’s Hair: An Essay on Personal Symbols and Religious Experience. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Okasha, Tharwat. The Muslim Painter and the Divine: The Persian Impact on Islamic Religious Painting. London: Park Lane, 1981.Google Scholar
Pahwa, Sonali. “Politics in the Digital Boudoir: Sentimentality and the Transformation of Civil Debate in Egyptian Women’s Blogs.” In Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions, edited by Hasso, Frances S. and Salime, Zakia, 2550. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Pandya, Sophia. “Women’s Shiʿi Maʾatim in Bahrain.” Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies 6, no. 2 (2010): 3158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parry, Jonathan. “Death and Digestion: The Symbolism of Food and Eating in North Indian Mortuary Rites.” Man 20, no. 4 (1985): 612630.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perry, Nicholas. Under the Heel of Mary, edited by Echeverría, Loreto. London: Routledge, 1988.Google Scholar
Peters, Emrys Lloyd. “A Muslim Passion Play: Key to a Lebanese Village.” Atlantic Monthly 198 (1956): 176180.Google Scholar
Pew Research Center. “The Future of the Global Muslim Population: Projections for 2010–2030.” https://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2011/01/FutureGlobalMuslimPopulation-WebPDF-Feb10.pdfGoogle Scholar
Pinault, David. “Shia Lamentation Rituals and Reinterpretations of the Doctrine of Intercession: Two Cases from Modern India.” History of Religions 38, no. 3 (1999): 285305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pinault, David. Horse of Karbala: Muslim Devotional Life in India. New York: Palgrave, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pinault, David. The Shiʿites: Ritual and Popular Piety in a Muslim Community. London: I. B. Tauris, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pinto, Paulo G.Mystical Bodies/Unruly Bodies: Experience, Empowerment and Subjectification in Syrian Sufism.” Social Compass 63, no. 2 (2016): 197212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Promey, Sally, and Brisman, Shira. “Sensory Cultures: Material and Visual Religion Reconsidered.” In Blackwell Companion to Religion in America, edited by Goff, Philip, 7277. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.Google Scholar
Qummi, Abbas. Mafātīḥ al-Jinān. Tehran: Chapkhana-yi Muhammad ʿAli ʿIlmi, 1964.Google Scholar
Qureshi, Regula B.Islamic Music in an Indian Environment: The Shiʿa Majlis.” Ethnomusicology 25, no. 1 (1981): 4171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rahimi, Babak. “Ayatollah Sistani and the Democratization of Post-Baʿathist Iraq.” In US Institute of Peace (2007). www.usip.org/publications/2007/06/ayatollah-sistani-and-democratization-post-baathist-iraqGoogle Scholar
Rancière, Jacques. Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy, translated by Rose, Julie. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Rancière, Jacques. La Mésentente. Paris: Galilée, 1995.Google Scholar
Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible, translated with an introduction by Rockhill, Gabriel. New York: Continuum, 2004.Google Scholar
Reynolds, Dwight F.Symbolic Narratives of Self: Dreams in Medieval Arabic Autobiographies.” In On Fiction and Adab in Medieval Arabic Literature, edited by Kennedy, P., 261286. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2005.Google Scholar
Ridgeon, Lloyd, ed. Shiʿi Islam and Identity: Religion, Politics and Change in the Global Muslim Community. London: I. B. Tauris, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rizvi, Sajjad H.Shiʿism in Bahrain: Marjaʿiyya and Politics.” Orient 4 (2009): 1624.Google Scholar
Rose, Nikolas. Inventing Our Selves: Psychology, Power, and Personhood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Rozehnal, Robert. “Flashes of Ultimate Reality: Dreams of Saints and Shrines in a Contemporary Pakistani Sufi Community.” Anthropology of the Contemporary Middle East and Central Eurasia 2, no. 1 (2014): 6780.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rubin, Uri. “Pre-Existence and Light – Aspects of the Concept of Nur Muḥammad.” Israel Oriental Studies 5 (1975): 62119 [Reprinted in Rubin, Uri. Muhammad the Prophet and Arabia, Variorum Collected Studies Series 4. Farnham: Ashgate, 2011].Google Scholar
Ruffle, Karen G.An Even Better Creation: The Role of Adam and Eve in Shiʿi Narratives about Fatimah al-Zahra.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 81, no. 3 (2013): 791819.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruffle, Karen G. Gender, Sainthood, and Everyday Practice in South Asian Shiʿism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruffle, Karen G.May Fatimah Gather Our Tears: The Mystical and Intercessory Powers of Fatimah al-Zahra in Indo-Persian, Shiʿi Devotional Literature and Performance.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 30, no. 3 (2010): 386397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Said, Edward. The World, the Text, and the Critic. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Saʿid, Haidar, ed. Al-Shīʿa al-ʿArab: Al-Hawiyya wa-l-Muwāṭṭana [Translated by the editor as: The Arab Shiites: Identity and Citizenship. www.dohainstitute.org/ar/BooksAndJournals/Pages/The-Arab-Shiites-Identity-and-Citizenship.aspx]. Doha: Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, 2019.Google Scholar
Saleh, Zainab. “‘Toppling’ Saddam Hussein in London: Media, Meaning, and the Construction of an Iraqi Diasporic Community.” American Anthropologist 120, no. 3 (2018): 512522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scarry, Elaine. The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver. “Creating Shia Spaces in British Society: The Role of Transnational Twelver Shia Networks in North-West London.” Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations 31, no. 1 (2020): 2340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver. “Khomeini and Muḥammad al-Shīrāzī: Revisiting the Origins of the ‘Guardianship of the Jurisconsult’ (wilāyat al-faqīh).” Die Welt des Islams: International Journal for the Study of Modern Islam 61, no. 1. (2020): 130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver. “A Minority within a Minority? The Complexity and Multilocality of Transnational Twelver Shia Networks in Britain.” Contemporary Islam 13 (2019): 287305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver. “Muslim Immigration to Ireland after World War II.” In Muslims in Ireland Past and Present, edited by Scharbrodt, Oliver, Sakaranaho, Tuula, Khan, Adil Hussein, Shanneik, Yafa, and Ibrahim, Vivian, 4975. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver. “Shaping the Public Image of Islam: the Shiis of Ireland as ‘Moderate’ Muslims.” Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 31 (2011): 523538.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver, Akgönül, Samim, Alibashić, Ahmet, Nielsen, Jørgen S., and Račius, Egdunas, eds. Yearbook of Muslims in Europe 8. Leiden: Brill, 2016.Google Scholar
Scharbrodt, Oliver, Tuula Sakaranaho, Adil Hussein Khan, Yafa Shanneik, , and Ibrahim, Vivian. Muslims in Ireland Past and Present. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schlatmann, Annemeik. “Towards a United Shia Youth Community: A ‘Dutch’ Muharram Gathering.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 260276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schubel, Vernon J. Religious Performance in Contemporary Islam: Shiʿi Devotional Rituals in South Asia. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Seremetakis, C. Nadia. “Durations of Pains: A Genealogy of Pain.” In Identities in Pain, edited by Frykman, J., Seremetakis, Constantina Nadia, and Ewert, Susanne, 151168. Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Seremetakis, C. Nadia.The Ethics of Antiphony: The Social Construction of Pain, Gender, and Power in the Southern Peloponnese.” Ethos 18, no. 4 (1990): 481512.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seremetakis, C. Nadia. The Last Word: Women, Death and Divination in Inner Mani. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Seremetakis, C. Nadia.The Social Construction of Pain, Gender, and Power in the Southern Peloponnese.” Ethos 18, no. 4 (1990): 481511.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shams al-Din, Muhammad Madhi. The Rising of Al-Ḥusayn: Its Impact on the Consciousness of Muslim Society. London: Muhammadi Trust of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 1985.Google Scholar
Shankland, David.Islam and Politics in Turkey: The 2007 Presidential Elections and Beyond.” International Affairs [London] 83, no. 2 (2007): 357372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa. “Gendering Religious Authority in the Diaspora: Shii Women in Ireland.” In Religion, Gender and the Public Sphere, edited by Reilly, Niamh and Scriver-Furlong, Stacey, 7080. New York: Routledge, 2013.Google Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa. “Moving into Shia Islam: The ‘Process of Subjectification’ among Shiʿa Women Converts in London.” In Moving In and Out of Islam, edited by van Nieuwkerk, Karin and Račius, Egdunas, 130151. New York: Routledge, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa. “Remembering Karbala in the Diaspora: Religious Rituals among Iraqi Shii Women in Ireland.” Religion 45, no. 1 (2015): 89102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa. “Shia Marriage Practices: Karbala as Lieux de Mémoire in London.” Social Sciences 6, no. 3 (2017): 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa, with Oliver Scharbrodt. “The Politics and Gender of Shia Ritual Practice: Contestations of Self-Flagellation (taṭbīr) in Europe and the Middle East.” Paper presented at the European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR) conference, University of Helsinki (June 28–July 1, 2016).Google Scholar
Shanneik, Yafa, Heinhold, Chris, and Ali, Zahra. “Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe.” Journal of Muslims in Europe 6, no. 2, Special Edition on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe: Local and Transnational Dimensions (2017): 145157.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shariati, Ali. Fatima Is Fatima, translated by Bakhtiar, Laleh. Tehran: Shariati Foundation, 1981.Google Scholar
Shariati, Ali. Shariati on Shariati and the Muslim Woman, edited by Bakhtiar, Laleh. Chicago: ABC International Group, 1996.Google Scholar
Shatiʼ, ʿAʾisha ʿAbd al-Raḥman Bint al-. ʿAqīlat Banī Hāshīm: Zaynab bint al-Zahrāʾ baṭalat Karbalāʾ 2. Beirut: Dar al-Kitab al-ʿArabi, 1972.Google Scholar
Shehabi, Omar H. al-. “Contested Modernity: Divided Rule and the Birth of Sectarianism, Nationalism, and Absolutism in Bahrain.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 44, no. 3 (2017): 333355.Google Scholar
Shehabi, Omar H. al-. Contested Modernity: Sectarianism, Nationalism, and Colonialism in Bahrain. London: One World Academic, 2019.Google Scholar
Shirazi, Faegheh. “The Sofreh: Comfort and Community among Women in Iran.” Iranian Studies 38, no. 2 (2005): 293309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sindawi, Khalid. “The Husayni Sermon (al-khoṭba al-ḥusayniyya) in Shiʿite Literature: Development, Structure, Venue, Preachers’ Titles.” Orientalia Suecana 54 (2005): 151178.Google Scholar
Sirriyeh, Elizabeth. Dreams and Visions in the World of Islam: A History of Muslim Dreaming and Foreknowing. London: I. B. Tauris, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skrbish, Zlatko. “The Apparitions of Virgin Mary of Medjugorje: The Convergence of Croatian Nationalism and her Apparitions.” Nations and Nationalism 11, no. 3 (2005): 443461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Gary. Benjamin: Philosophy, Aesthetics. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1989.Google Scholar
Snehi, Yogesh. “Dreaming Baba, Resituating Memory: Popular Sufi Shrines and the Historiography of Contemporary East Punjab.” Anthropology of the Contemporary Middle East and Central Eurasia 2, no. 1 (2014): 324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snow, David. “Extending and Broadening Blumer’s Conceptualization of Symbolic Interactionism.” Symbolic Interaction 24, no. 3 (2001): 367377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snow, David, and Davis, Phillip W.. “The Chicago Approach to Collective Behavior.” In A Second Chicago School? The Development of Postwar American Sociology, edited by Fine, G. A., 188220. Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Snow, David A., and Davis, Philip W.. “The Study of Collective Behavior: An Elaboration and Critical Assessment.” In Self, Collective Behavior and Society: Essays Honoring the Contributions of Ralph H. Turner, edited by Platt, G. M. and Gordon, C., 97115. Greenwich, CN: JAI Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Soileau, Mark. “Spreading the Sufra: Sharing and Partaking in the Bektashi Ritual Meal.” History of Religions 52, no. 1 (2012): 130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sokół, Grzegorz. “Matska Boska Czestochowsha Jako Polski Symbol Narodowy.” Konteksty 1–2 (2002): 120125.Google Scholar
Soufi, Denise L. “The Image of Fatima in Classical Muslim Thought.” PhD Dissertation, Princeton University, 1997.Google Scholar
Spellmann-Poots, Katherine, and Gholami, Reza. “Integration, Cultural Production, and Challenges of Identity Construction: Iranians in Great Britain.” In The Iranian Diaspora: Challenges, Negotiations, and Transformations, edited by Mobasher, Mohsen Mostafavi, 93124. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Staarmann, André. “Iran.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 171188. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Stetkevych, Suzanne Pinckney. The Mute Immortals Speak: Pre-Islamic Poetry and the Poetics of Ritual. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Stetkevych, Suzanne Pinckney. Poetics of Islamic Legitimacy: Myth, Gender, and Ceremony in the Classical Arabic Code. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Strauss, Julia, and O’Brien, Donal Cruise, eds. Staging Politics: Power and Performance in Asia and Africa. London: I. B. Tauris, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Suleman, Fahmida. “The Hand of Fatima: In Search of Its Origins and Significance.” In People of the Prophet’s House: Artistic and Ritual Expressions of Shiʿi Islam, edited by Suleman, Fahmida, 173188. London: Islamic Publications, 2015.Google Scholar
Suleman, Fahmida. People of the Prophet’s House: Artistic and Ritual Expressions of Shiʿi Islam. Institute of Ismaili Studies and British Library: Islamic Publications, Azimuth Editions, 2015.Google Scholar
Sullivan, Lawrence E.Sound and Senses: Toward a Hermeneutics of Performance.” History of Religions 26, no. 1 (1986): 133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sultanova, Razia. “Yassavi zikr in Twenty-First Century Central Asia: Sound, Place and Authenticity.” Performing Islam 1, no. 1 (2012): 129151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szanto, Edith. “Beyond the Karbala Paradigm: Rethinking Revolution and Redemption in Twelver Shiʿa Mourning Rituals.” Journal of Shiʿa Islamic Studies 6, no. 1 (2013): 7591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szanto, Edith. “Challenging Transnational Shiʿi Authority in Baʿth Syria.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 45, no. 1 (2018): 95110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szanto, Edith. “Sayyida Zaynab in the State of Exception: Shiʿi Sainthood as ‘Qualified Life.’” International Journal of Middle East Studies 44, no. 2 (2012): 285299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tabar, Paul. “Ashura in Sydney: A Transformation of a Religious Ceremony in the Context of a Migrant Society.” Journal of Intercultural Studies 23, no. 3 (2002): 285305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tabari, Muhammad Ibn Jarir al-. Tārīkh al-Rusul wa-l-Mulūk (The Crisis of the Early Caliphate), translated and annotated by Stephen Humphreys, R.. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Tajir, Mahdi Abdalla al-. Bahrain 1920–1945: Britain, the Shaikh and the Administration. London: Croom Helm, 1987.Google Scholar
Takim, Liakat. “Reinterpretation or Reformation? Shiʿa Law in the West.” Journal of Shiʿa Islamic Studies 3, no. 2 (2010): 143144.Google Scholar
Takim, Liyakat. Shiʿism in America. New York: New York University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Tambar, Kabir. “Iterations of Lament: Anachronism and Affect in a Shiʿi Islamic Revival in Turkey.” American Ethnologist 38, no. 3 (1990): 484500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tambar, Kabir. The Reckoning of Pluralism: Political Belonging and the Demands of History in Turkey. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Tapper, R., and Tapper, N.. “‘Eat This, It’ll Do You a Power of Good’: Food and Commensality among Durrani Pashtuns.” American Ethnologist 13, no. 1 (1986): 6279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tarrow, Sidney G. Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics. Studies in Comparative Politics. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tawus, Radi al-Din Ali b. Musa b. Jaʿfar b. Al-Lahūf fi Qaṭ la al-Ṭufūf. Tehran: Dar al-ʿAlam li-l-Nashr, 1929.Google Scholar
Thaiss, Gustav E.Religious Symbolism and Social Change: The Drama of Husain.” In Scholars, Saints and Sufis in Muslim Religious Institutions in the Middle East since 1500, edited by Keddie, Nikki R., 349366. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Theillier, Patrick. Lourdes, When One Speaks of Miracles. Augsburg: Sankt-Ulrich, 2003.Google Scholar
Thomas, David. “The Miracles of Jesus in Early Islamic Polemic.” Journal of Semitic Studies 39, no. 2 (1994): 221243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thurlkill, Mary F.Chosen Among Women: Mary and Fatima in Medieval Christianity and Shiʿite Islam.” Pakistan Journal of Women’s Studies: Alam-e-Niswan 14, no. 2 (2007): 2751.Google Scholar
Tilly, Charles. Popular Contention in Great Britain, 1758–1834. New York: Harvard University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Torab, Azam. “Neighbourhood and Piety: Gender and Ritual in South Tehran.” PhD Dissertation, University of London, 1998.Google Scholar
Torab, Azam. Performing Islam: Gender and Ritual in Iran. Leiden: Brill, 2007.Google Scholar
Torab, Azam. “Piety as Gendered Agency: A Study of Jalaseh Ritual Discourse in an Urban Neighbourhood in Iran.” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Society (NS) 2, no. 2 (1996): 235252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Torab, Azam. “The Politicization of Women’s Religious Circles in Post-Revolutionary Iran.” In Women, Religion and Culture in Iran, edited by Ansari, Sarah and Martin, Vanessa, 143168. London: Curzon 2002.Google Scholar
Tripp, Charles. “The Art of Resistance in the Middle East.” Asian Affairs 43, no. 3 (2012): 393409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tripp, Charles. A History of Iraq. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tripp, Charles. “Performing the Public: Theatres of Power in the Middle East.” Constellations 20, no. 2 (2013): 203216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tripp, Charles. “The Politics of Resistance and the Arab Uprisings.” In The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World, edited by Gerges, F., 135154. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tripp, Charles. The Power and the People: Paths of Resistance in the Middle East. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tripp, Charles. “The State as an Always-Unfinished Performance: Improvisation and Performativity in the Face of Crisis.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 50, no. 2 (2018): 337342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turner, Victor. The Forest of Symbols: Aspects of Ndembu Ritual. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Turner, Victor. Image and Pilgrimage in Christian Culture: Anthropological Perspectives, edited by Turner, Edith. Oxford: Blackwell, 1978.Google Scholar
Tweed, Thomas A. Our Lady of the Exile: Diasporic Religion at a Cuban Catholic Shrine in Miami. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Urban, Greg. “Ritual Wailing in Amerindian Brazil.” American Anthropologist 90, no. 2 (1988): 385400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vaglieri, Laura Veccia.Fatima.” In Encyclopedia of Islam 3: C–G, New ed., edited by Lewis, B., Pellat, C. and Schacht, J., 841850. Leiden: Brill 1991.Google Scholar
Valeri, Marc. “Contentious Politics in Bahrain: Opposition Cooperation between Regime Manipulation and Youth Radicalisation.” In The Dynamics of Opposition Cooperation in the Arab World: Contentious Politics in Times of Change, edited by Kraetzschmar, Hendrik, 129149. New York: Routledge, 2012.Google Scholar
Van, Gelder, Geert, Jan.Foul Whisperings: Madness and Poetry in Arabic Literary History.” In Arabic Humanities, Islamic Thought: Essays in Honor of Everett K. Rowson, edited by Lowry, Joseph and Toorawa, Shawkat, 150175. Leiden: Brill, 2017.Google Scholar
Waddah, Sharara. Transformations d’une manifestation religieuse dans un village du Liban-Sud. Beirut: University of Michigan Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Waʾili, Ahmad al-. Tajāribī maʿa al-Minbar. Beirut: Dar al-Zahra, 1988.Google Scholar
Walbridge, Linda S., ed. The Most Learned of the Shiʿa: The Institution of the Marjaʿi Taqlid. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walbridge, Linda S. Without Forgetting the Imam: Lebanese Shiʿism in an American Community. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Wehrey, Frederic M. Sectarian Politics in the Gulf: From the Iraq War to the Arab Uprisings. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Wenger, Etienne. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wertsch, James V., and Roediger, Henry L.. “Collective Memory: Conceptual Foundations and Theoretical Approaches.” Memory 16, no. 3 (2008): 318326.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wheelock, Wade T.The Problem of Ritual Language: From Information to Situation.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 50, no. 1 (1982): 4972.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilce, James. Eloquence in Trouble: The Poetics and Politics of Complaint in Rural Bangladesh. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Wilce, James. Language and Emotion. Studies in the Social and Cultural Foundations of Language 25. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Wilce, James. “The Pragmatics of ‘Madness’: Performance Analysis of a Bangladeshi Woman’s ‘Aberrant’ Lament.” Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 22, no. 1 (1998): 154.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wilce, James. “Traditional Laments and Postmodern Regrets: The Circulation of Discourse in Metacultural Context.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 15, no. 1 (2005): 6071.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, Bernard. Shame and Necessity. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williamson-Fa, Stefan J. “‘Hüseynʾim Vay!’: Voice and Recitation in Contemporary Turkish Shiʿism.” In Diversity and Contact among Singer-Poet Traditions in Eastern Anatolia, edited by Ulaş Özdemir, Wendelmoet Hamelink, Martin Greve 209-224. Baden-Baden: Ergon Verlag, 2018.Google Scholar
Wirth, Andrzej. “Semeiological Aspects of the Taʿziyeh.” In Taʿziyeh: Ritual and Drama in Iran, edited by Chelkowski, Peter J., 3239. New York: New York University Press, 1970.Google Scholar
Wolf, Eric R.The Virgin of Guadalupe: A Mexican National Symbol.” Journal of American Folklore 71, no. 279 (1958): 3439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolf, Richard K.Embodiment and Ambivalence: Emotion in South Asian Muharram Drumming.” Yearbook for Traditional Music 32 (2000): 81116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolf, Richard K. The Voice in the Drum: Music, Language, and Emotion in Islamicate South Asia. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yahya, Harun. Miracles of the Qurʾan. Scarborough, Ontario: Al-Attique Publishers, 2001.Google Scholar
Yilmaz, Zeynep. “Iran.” In Staatenlexikon Asien: Geographie, Geschichte, Kultur, Politik und Wirtschaft, edited by Gieler, Wolfgang and Wege, Sabine, 287296. Berlin: Peter Lang, 2021.Google Scholar
Zimdars-Swartz, Sandra. Encountering Mary: From la Salette to Medjugorje. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar