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Part III - Policy Responses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2020

Frank Biermann
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Rakhyun E. Kim
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Architectures of Earth System Governance
Institutional Complexity and Structural Transformation
, pp. 181 - 296
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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