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3 - Ethnography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Stephen Pihlaja
Affiliation:
Newman University
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Summary

Examines ethnography as an approach to understanding language and literacy practices of particular religious communities, with researchers living and working among religious believers to gain important insider insights about how religious practice and belief is enacted in believers’ lives.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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