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1 - Analysing Religious Discourse: Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Stephen Pihlaja
Affiliation:
Newman University
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Summary

Introduces the concepts of language and religion and discourse and discusses the place of the book in the context of the history of the stury of theolinguistics and religious language.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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