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7 - Education Savings Accounts and Controversies Beyond

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 April 2020

Ursula Hackett
Affiliation:
Royal Holloway, University of London
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Summary

Yet decades into the twenty-first century, the secularist, communitarian, and race-conscious orders’ hold upon America’s judicial institutions now appears increasingly shaky. Growing partisan alignment within America’s foundational struggles binds the fate of these orders closer to the fortunes of the Democratic Party. Republican Party power lends strength to individualist, accommodationist, and color-blind forces. Policy goals that were once likely to receive an unsympathetic hearing – whether white nativism, religious accommodation, or program privatization – are elevated by the Trump presidency. Hence, there is less need for individualists, accommodationists, and color-blind orders to attenuate the connection between the central government and these policy goals. They can pursue them openly. The passage, growth, and legal durability of doubly distanced tax credit scholarships since 2010 have given legal cover for policymakers and advocates to experiment with new forms of voucher program: education savings accounts (ESAs). ESAs are typically less attenuated in policy delivery than tax credit scholarships.

Type
Chapter
Information
America's Voucher Politics
How Elites Learned to Hide the State
, pp. 165 - 180
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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