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Prologue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2014

Jack Citrin
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
David O. Sears
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
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Summary

The monumental legislative changes of 1964 and 1965 that changed American history forever are the catalysts for this book. In 1964, as a response to the growing strength of the civil rights movement, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act. In 1965, the Voting Rights Act put a dagger in the heart of the two-caste racial system in the South, a system that had existed for the more than three centuries since African slaves were first imported to North America. In 1965, the Hart-Celler Immigration and Nationality Act, on the surface tinkering only modestly with prevailing immigration priorities, unexpectedly opened the floodgates to massive influxes of non-European immigration over the course of the next half century.

The consequence of immigration reform has been a rapid rise in the cultural diversity of the nation, mimicking a similar surge a century earlier. Those changes reshaped an overwhelmingly white nation with relatively small minorities of African Americans and Native Americans deliberately kept largely out of sight of the mainstream. In 1965, the United States began on a path that will, a few decades from now, turn it into a nation with no majority racial or ethnic group.1 Just as important, accompanying this demographic change have been new political movements demanding greater equality not only for African Americans but for Latinos and Asian Americans as well.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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References

Norman, Wayne, “Theorizing Nationalism (Normatively): The First Steps,” in Theorizing Nationalism, ed. Beiner, Ronald (Albany: State University of Press of New York, 1999), 53Google Scholar
Schuck, Peter, “Immigration,” in Understanding America, ed. Schuck, Peter and Wilson, James Q. (Polity Press: New York, 2007), 361Google Scholar
Tichenor, Daniel, Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2002), 51Google Scholar
Citrin, Jack and Wright, Matthew, “The Politics of Immigration in a Nation of Immigrants,” in New Directions in American Politics, ed. La Raja, Raymond J. (New York: Routledge, 2013), 238Google Scholar
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Taylor, Charles, “The Politics of Recognition,” in Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition, edited by Gutmann, Amy (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994)Google Scholar
Kelly, Paul, “Introduction: Between Culture and Equality,” in Multiculturalism Reconsidered, ed. Kelly, Paul (Malden, MA: Polity Press, 2002), 4Google Scholar
Spinner, Jeffrey, The Boundaries of Citizenship (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1994)Google Scholar
Mannheim, Karl, “The Problem of Generations,” in Essays in the Sociology of Knowledge, by Manheim, Karl, ed. Kecskemeti, Paul (Orlando, FL: Mariner Books, 1955)Google Scholar
Huntington, Samuel P., Who Are We?: Challenges to American Identity (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004)Google Scholar
Citrin, Jack, Lerman, Amy, Murakami, Michael, and Pearson, Kathryn, “Testing Huntington: Is Hispanic Immigration a Threat to American Identity?,” Perspectives on Politics 1 (March 2007): 31–48Google Scholar
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  • Prologue
  • Jack Citrin, University of California, Berkeley, David O. Sears, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: American Identity and the Politics of Multiculturalism
  • Online publication: 05 September 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139028967.002
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Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Prologue
  • Jack Citrin, University of California, Berkeley, David O. Sears, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: American Identity and the Politics of Multiculturalism
  • Online publication: 05 September 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139028967.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Prologue
  • Jack Citrin, University of California, Berkeley, David O. Sears, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: American Identity and the Politics of Multiculturalism
  • Online publication: 05 September 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139028967.002
Available formats
×