Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.175 Render date: 2021-12-07T19:45:59.984Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

1 - Altruism, transfers, and wellbeing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2009

Oded Stark
Affiliation:
Universitetet i Oslo
Get access

Summary

Introduction

In all economies, but particularly in less developed countries, a considerable proportion of resource transfers takes place outside the realm of the marketplace: inside families, within households, and among members of kin group or caste. Often it is not all that clear what exactly these transfers “buy”: we do not see commodities moving in the reverse direction nor do we observe a flow of easily definable services. For example, households in rural India “purchase” insurance against variability in consumption not from insurance companies but from other households whose sons marry their daughters, and whose incomes exhibit low covariability with their own (Rosenzweig and Stark [1989]). Such actions are different from typical marketplace exchanges where the transfer of a commodity from A to B is accompanied by the transfer of another commodity from B to A and where one of the exchangeables is money, so that it is quite clear what is being bought – and at what price. It is generally argued that nonmarket intragroup transfers are mandated by the insufficient development of markets and that as development proceeds, a larger share of transfers and exchanges is relegated to the marketplace. This reassignment is believed to hasten the pace of economic development as the scope for exchange and trading opportunities increases. This, in turn, should feed back into the production opportunities set by facilitating increased specialization and recourse to comparative advantage.

The precise mechanisms that generate nonmarket transfers have not so far been well explored.

Type
Chapter
Information
Altruism and Beyond
An Economic Analysis of Transfers and Exchanges within Families and Groups
, pp. 11 - 30
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×