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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2016

Gerald C. Cupchik
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
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The Aesthetics of Emotion
Up the Down Staircase of the Mind-Body
, pp. 342 - 372
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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