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Chapter 15 - Stroke Rehabilitation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019

Mary Carter Denny
Affiliation:
Georgetown University Hospital
Ahmad Riad Ramadan
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Sean I. Savitz
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
James Grotta
Affiliation:
Memorial Hermann Texas Medical School
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Summary

Stroke rehabilitation begins during the acute hospitalization once the patient is medically and neurologically stable. Rehabilitation, with involvement of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation team early during the care of the stroke patient, is one of the critical components of stroke unit care that results in improved outcome and shortened length of stay. While practices vary between countries and among hospitals, at our centers and in most US stroke centers the major focus of rehabilitative efforts occurs after discharge from the acute stroke unit, and is beyond the scope of this book (e.g. the EXCITE trial of constraint-induced movement therapy).

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Chapter
Information
Acute Stroke Care , pp. 226 - 236
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Wolf, SL, Winstein, CJ, Miller, JP, et al.; EXCITE Investigators. Effect of constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function 3 to 9 months after stroke: the EXCITE randomized clinical trial. JAMA 2006; 296: 20952104. doi:10.1001/jama.296.17.2095.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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AVERT Trial Collaboration group. Efficacy and safety of very early mobilization within 24 h of stroke onset (AVERT): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2015: 386: 4655.CrossRef
Langhorne, PWu, ORodgers, H, Ashburn, A, Bernhardt, J. A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial after stroke (AVERT): a phase III, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Health Technol Assess 2017; 21: 1120. doi:10.3310/hta21540.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chollet, FTardy, JAlbucher, JF, et al. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischaemic stroke (FLAME): a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Neurol 2011; 10: 123130. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(10)70314-8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
FOCUS Trial Collaboration. Effects of fluoxetine on functional outcomes after acute stroke (FOCUS): a pragmatic, double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. Lancet 2019; 393: 265274. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32823-X.CrossRef
Duncan, PW, Zorowitz, R, Bates, B, et al. Management of adult stroke rehabilitation care: a clinical practice guideline. Stroke 2005; 36: e100143.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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