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Chapter 11 - Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019

Mary Carter Denny
Affiliation:
Georgetown University Hospital
Ahmad Riad Ramadan
Affiliation:
Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
Sean I. Savitz
Affiliation:
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
James Grotta
Affiliation:
Memorial Hermann Texas Medical School
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Summary

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is the thrombosis of dural venous sinuses and/or cerebral veins. It accounts for 0.5% of all strokes. It occurs predominantly in the younger population (usually < 50 years old, median age of 37). Female-to-male ratio is 3 to 1, likely secondary to sex-specific thrombogenic states including pregnancy, puerperium, oral contraceptive pill use, and hormonal therapy.

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Chapter
Information
Acute Stroke Care , pp. 168 - 174
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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