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Part II - Practices of Action Ascription

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2022

Arnulf Deppermann
Affiliation:
Universität Mannheim, Germany
Michael Haugh
Affiliation:
University of Queensland
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Print publication year: 2022

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