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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2021

Charles Boberg
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Accent in North American Film and Television
A Sociophonetic Analysis
, pp. 324 - 342
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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