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Leaf compatible “eco-friendly” temperature sensor clip for high density monitoring wireless networks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2017

Valeria Palazzari*
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
Paolo Mezzanotte
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
Federico Alimenti
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
Francesco Fratini
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
Giulia Orecchini
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
Luca Roselli
Affiliation:
DI – Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, via Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia, Italy. Phone: +39 0755853633
*
Corresponding author: V. Palazzari Email: valeria.palazzari@gmail.com

Abstract

This paper describes the design, realization, and application of a custom temperature sensor devoted to the monitoring of the temperature differential between the leaf and the air. This difference is strictly related to the plant water stress and can be used as an input information for an intelligent and flexible irrigation system. A wireless temperature sensor network can be thought as a decision support system used to start irrigation when effectively needed by the cultivation, thus saving water, pump fuel oil, and preventing plant illness caused by over-watering.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

REFERENCES

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Leaf compatible “eco-friendly” temperature sensor clip for high density monitoring wireless networks
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