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Weed Control Efficacy and Pinto Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Tolerance to Early Season Mechanical Weeding

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Mark J. Vangessel
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Pathol., Weed Sci., Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Lori J. Wiles
Affiliation:
Water Manage. Res., Agric. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric., Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Edward E. Schweizer
Affiliation:
Water Manage. Res., Agric. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric., Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Phil Westra
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Pathol. and Weed Sci., Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO 80523

Abstract

An integrated approach to weed management in pinto bean is needed since available herbicides seldom adequately control all weed species present in a field. A two-year study was conducted to assess weed control efficacy and pinto bean tolerance to mechanical weeding from a rotary hoe or flex-tine harrow at crook, unifoliolate, and trifoliolate stages of bean development. Weed control was similar for both implements and all timings in 1993. In 1994, mechanical weeding at trifoliolate and both crook and trifoliolate stages controlled more weeds than at other growth stages, regardless of type of implement. Using the flex-tine harrow reduced pinto bean stand, but results based on growth stage were not consistent each year. Damage to pinto bean hypocotyls and stems was observed with the flex-tine harrow used at both crook and trifoliolate stages in 1994. Rotary hoeing did not reduce pinto bean stand or cause injury. Yield and seed weight did not differ among treatments in either year.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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