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Response of Miscanthus × giganteus and Miscanthus sinensis to Postemergence Herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Wesley J. Everman
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Alexander J. Lindsey
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Gerald M. Henry
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2122
Calvin F. Glaspie
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Kristin Phillips
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2122
Cynthia McKenney
Affiliation:
Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2122
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Studies were conducted under greenhouse conditions at Michigan State University and Texas Tech University to investigate the tolerance of Miscanthus × giganteus and Miscanthus sinensis to POST herbicides. Miscanthus sinensis and M. × giganteus were treated with 10 and 18 POST herbicide treatments, respectively. Plants were evaluated for injury as well as dry aboveground and belowground biomass production 28 days after treatment. Imazethapyr at 0.069 kg ai ha−1 caused 5% injury to M. sinensis, which was greater than the nontreated check. Imazethapyr, imazamox at 0.044 kg ai ha−1, and rimsulfuron at 0.017 kg ai ha−1 reduced aboveground biomass of M. sinensis compared with the nontreated check. Dicamba at 0.56 kg ai ha−1 and halosulfuron at 0.035 kg ai ha−1 resulted in M. sinensis aboveground biomass similar to the nontreated check. Injury exhibited by M. × giganteus was greater than the nontreated check with glyphosate at 0.84 kg ae ha−1 (54%), foramsulfuron at 0.037 kg ai ha−1 (32%), nicosulfuron at 0.035 kg ai ha−1 (28%), and imazamox at 0.044 kg ai ha−1 (10%). These treatments also yielded the lowest aboveground biomass values. The results of this study demonstrate that M. sinensis is more tolerant of the POST herbicides tested here than M.×x. giganteus. Several herbicide options may be available for weed management in M. sinensis and M. × giganteus stands following additional field trials to validate initial findings.

En la Universidad Estatal de Michigan y la Universidad Tecnológica de Texas se realizaron estudios bajo condiciones de invernadero, para investigar la tolerancia de Miscanthus × giganteus y Miscanthus sinensis a herbicidas post-emergentes (POST), los cuales recibieron 18 y 10 tratamientos POST, respectivamente. Se evaluó el nivel de daño la producción de biomasa seca de las plantas sobre y bajo el suelo, 28 días después del tratamiento (DAT). Imazethapyr a 0.069 kg ia ha−1 causó 5% de daño a M. sinensis, lo cual fue mayor que el testigo no tratado. Los tratamientos con imazethapyr, imazamox a 0.044 kg ia ha−1, y rimsulfuron a 0.017 kg ia ha−1, redujeron la biomasa aérea de M. sinensis, en comparación al testigo no tratado. Tratamientos de dicamba a 0.56 kg ia ha−1 y halosulfuron a 0.035 kg ia ha−1 resultaron en una biomasa aérea de M. sinensis similar a la del testigo no tratado. El daño exhibido por M. × giganteus fue mayor que el testigo no tratado, cuando se utilizó glyphosate a 0.84 kg ea ha−1 (54%), foramsulfuron a 0.037 kg ia ha−1 (32%), nicosulfuron a 0.035 kg ia ha−1 (28%), e imazamox a 0.044 kg ia ha−1 (10%). Estos tratamientos también mostraron los rendimientos más bajos de biomasa aérea. Los resultados de este estudio demuestran que M. sinensis es más tolerante a los herbicidas POST usados aquí que M. × giganteus. Varias opciones de herbicidas podrían estar disponibles para el manejo de malezas en plantaciones de M. sinensis y M. × giganteus después de que se realicen estudios de campo adicionales para validar los resultados iniciales.

Type
Weed Management—Other Crops/Areas
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Response of Miscanthus × giganteus and Miscanthus sinensis to Postemergence Herbicides
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