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Limpograss (Hemarthria altissima) Tolerance to Hexazinone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2017

Cody A. Lastinger
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW 71 Street, Gainesville, FL 32653
José Luiz C. S. Dias
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Professor, and Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, University of Florida Range Cattle Research and Education Center, 3401 Experiment Station, Ona, FL 33865
Brent A. Sellers*
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Professor, and Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, University of Florida Range Cattle Research and Education Center, 3401 Experiment Station, Ona, FL 33865
Jason A. Ferrell
Affiliation:
Professor, Agronomy Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110500, Gainesville, FL 32611
Maria L. Silveira
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Soil and Water Sciences Department, University of Florida Range Cattle Research and Education Center, 3401 Experiment Station, Ona, FL 33865
João M. B. Vendramini
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, Professor, and Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, University of Florida Range Cattle Research and Education Center, 3401 Experiment Station, Ona, FL 33865
*
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: sellersb@ufl.edu

Abstract

Field trials were conducted in 2013 and 2014 to investigate the tolerance of limpograss to increasing rates of hexazinone. Dose-response curves were generated using linear and quadratic regression models to determine the hexazinone estimated dose (ED) required to provide 10% (ED10) and 20% (ED20) of visual injury and herbage mass reduction. The ED10 and ED20 for visual estimates of injury were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.14 kg ai ha-1 at 60 d after treatment (DAT). Regarding forage herbage mass reduction, the ED10 and ED20 were estimated to be 0.07 and 0.19 kg ai ha-1 in 2013, whereas in 2014, the ED10 and ED20 were estimated to be 0.03 and 0.06 kg ai ha-1, respectively. The significant difference in herbage mass reduction between 2013 and 2014 was likely due to rainfall patterns, which possibly promoted hexazinone leaching in 2013 and consequently, less activity. Overall, hexazinone resulted in high degrees of limpograss injury across all response variables in both years; therefore, smutgrass control in limpograss pastures with hexazinone may not be a viable option. The presence or absence of smutgrass should be considered before limpograss establishment as there is no viable herbicide to selectively remove smutgrass from limpograss swards.

Type
Weed Management-Other Crops/Areas
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2017 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Kevin Bradley, University of Missouri.

References

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