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Interactions Between Quizalofop-p-ethyl and Acetolactate Synthase–Inhibiting Herbicides in Acetyl-coA Carboxylase Inhibitor–Resistant Rice Production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 April 2018

Samer Y. Rustom
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Eric P. Webster*
Affiliation:
Professor, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
David C. Blouin
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Benjamin M. McKnight
Affiliation:
Research Associate, School of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Eric P. Webster, Department of Plant, Environmental, and Soil Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803. (E-mail: ewebster@agcenter.lsu.edu)

Abstract

A field study was conducted in 2015 and 2016 at the H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station (RRS) to evaluate antagonistic, synergistic, or neutral interactions of quizalofop when mixed with ALS-inhibiting herbicides labeled in rice production. Quizalofop was applied at 120 g ai ha−1. Mixture herbicides included penoxsulam at 40 g ai ha−1, penoxsulam+triclopyr at 352 g ai ha−1, halosulfuron at 53 g ai ha−1, bispyribac at 34 g ai ha−1, orthosulfamuron+halosulfuron at 94 g ai ha−1, orthosulfamuron+quinclorac at 491 g ai ha−1, imazosulfuron at 211 g ai ha−1, and bensulfuron at 43 g ai ha−1. All ALS herbicides mixed with quizalofop indicated antagonistic responses for red rice, CL-111, CLXL 745, or barnyardgrass control at either 14 or 28 days after treatment (DAT). At 28 DAT, quizalofop mixed with penoxsulam or bispyribac controlled barnyardgrass 34 to 38%, compared with an expected control of 97%. In addition, these same mixtures controlled red rice, CL-111, and CLXL-745 61 to 67% at 28 DAT compared with an expected control of 96 to 97%. A second application of quizalofop at 120 g ha−1 was applied at 28 DAT. At 42 DAT, neutral responses were indicated for all mixtures except with quizalofop mixed with penoxsulam containing products.

Type
Weed Management-Major Crops
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2018 

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Interactions Between Quizalofop-p-ethyl and Acetolactate Synthase–Inhibiting Herbicides in Acetyl-coA Carboxylase Inhibitor–Resistant Rice Production
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