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Glufosinate-Resistant, BAR-Transformed Rice (Oryza sativa) and Red Rice (Oryza sativa) Response to Glufosinate Alone and in Mixtures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017


Sujatha Sankula
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Crop Physiology, 302 Life Sciences Building, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Michael P. Braverman
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Crop Physiology, 302 Life Sciences Building, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Steven D. Linscombe
Affiliation:
Rice Research Station, Crowley, LA 70527

Abstract

Glufosinate applied postemergence alone and in mixture with pendimethalin, thiobencarb, quinclorac, propanil, bensulfuron, bentazon, acifluorfen, or triclopyr was evaluated on bialaphosresistant (BAR) rice and red rice in field studies. Glufosinate at 2.2 kg ai/ha alone was less phytotoxic (6%) to BAR-transformed rice than when it was applied in combination with 0.4 kg ai/ha triclopyr (59%) or 0.6 kg ai/ha acifluorfen (22%). Rice yield with glufosinate alone was similar to the weed-free check the first year, but 13% less than the weed-free check the second year. For the glufosinate plus triclopyr mixture, rice yield was reduced by 39 and 76% compared with glufosinate alone in 1994 and 1995, respectively. Red rice control was 92% with either 3.4 kg ai/ha propanil or 0.6 kg/ha acifluorfen mixed with 0.6 kg/ha glufosinate, which was greater than for glufosinate alone and the other combinations. Propanil or acifluorfen mixed with glufosinate reduced red rice plant height, panicle maturity, and 100-seed weight 16, 31, and 24%, respectively, compared to glufosinate alone and 30, 48, and 43%, respectively, compared to the nontreated weedy check.


Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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