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Glufosinate plus Dicamba for Rescue Palmer Amaranth Control in XtendFlexTM Cotton

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2017

Rachel A. Vann*
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus, Undergraduate Assistant, Undergraduate Assistant, and Research Specialist, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Alan C. York
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus, Undergraduate Assistant, Undergraduate Assistant, and Research Specialist, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Charles W. Cahoon Jr
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Virginia Tech, Painter, VA 23240
Trace B. Buck
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus, Undergraduate Assistant, Undergraduate Assistant, and Research Specialist, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Matthew C. Askew
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus, Undergraduate Assistant, Undergraduate Assistant, and Research Specialist, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
Richard W. Seagroves
Affiliation:
Graduate Research Assistant, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus, Undergraduate Assistant, Undergraduate Assistant, and Research Specialist, Crop and Soil Sciences Department, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620
*
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: raatwell@ncsu.edu

Abstract

Cotton growers commonly use glufosinate-based programs to control glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth. Palmer amaranth must be small (≤7.5 cm) for consistent control by glufosinate, and growers often miss the optimum application timing. XtendFlex cotton may provide growers a tool to control larger Palmer amaranth. Glufosinate, dicamba, and glufosinate plus dicamba were compared for Palmer amaranth control in a rescue situation. Herbicides were applied to 16- to 23-cm weeds (POST-1) followed by a second application (POST-2) 12 d later. Glufosinate-ammonium at 590 g ai ha−1 plus dicamba diglycolamine salt at 560 g ae ha−1 POST-1 followed by glufosinate plus dicamba POST-2 was more effective than glufosinate at 880 g ha−1 POST-1 followed by glufosinate at 590 g ha−1 POST-2 or dicamba alone applied twice. Following a directed layby application of glyphosate, diuron, and S-metolachlor 14 d after POST-2, Palmer amaranth was controlled 99% by any system containing dicamba or glufosinate plus dicamba POST-1 followed by dicamba, glufosinate, or glufosinate plus dicamba POST-2 compared with 87% to 91% control by glufosinate alone applied twice. Cotton height and number of main stem nodes at layby were reduced in systems with dicamba only POST-1 followed by dicamba or glufosinate plus dicamba POST-2, presumably due to competition from the slowly dying Palmer amaranth with dicamba only POST-1. These treatments also delayed cotton maturity and reduced lint yield compared with systems containing glufosinate plus dicamba at POST-1.

Type
Weed Management-Major Crops
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2017 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Daniel Stephenson, Louisana State University Agricultural Center.

References

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