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Effects of Low-Dose Flumioxazin and Metribuzin Postemergence Applications on Soybean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 December 2018

Daniel O. Stephenson IV*
Affiliation:
Professor, Dean Lee Research and Extension Center, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Alexandria, LA, USA
Todd A. Spivey
Affiliation:
Former Assistant Professor, Dean Lee Research and Extension Center, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Alexandria, LA, USA
Michael A. Deliberto Jr.
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
David C. Blouin
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA
Brandi C. Woolam
Affiliation:
Research Associate, Dean Lee Research and Extension Center, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Alexandria, LA, USA
Trace B. Buck
Affiliation:
Former Graduate Research Assistant, Dean Lee Research and Extension Center, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Alexandria, LA, USA
*
Author for correspondence: Daniel O. Stephenson, IV, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Dean Lee Research and Extension Center, 8105 Tom Bowman Drive, Alexandria, LA 71302 (Email: dstephenson@agcenter.lsu.edu)

Abstract

All herbicides will move off-target to sensitive crops when not applied correctly. Therefore, low-dose applications of flumioxazin and metribuzin were evaluated in soybean at the unifoliate, V2, and V4 growth stages. Rates evaluated were 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the labeled use rates of 72 and 316 g ai ha−1 of flumioxazin and metribuzin, respectively. Flumioxazin injury was characterized by necrosis and visible height and width reduction. Injury increased with rate 3 d after treatment (DAT), with unifoliate, V2, and V4 soybean injured 15% to 30%, 18% to 27%, and 5% to 8%, respectively. Unifoliate and V4 soybean were injured more than V4 soybean 3 to 14 DAT, but injury decreased to <5% by 42 DAT. Soybean yields in the flumioxazin study were 92% to 96% of the nontreated, resulting in a yield loss of 196 to 393 kg ha−1 and a revenue loss of 71 to 141 US$ ha−1. Metribuzin injury was primarily chlorosis with necrosis and a visible reduction in soybean height and width. Soybean at the V2 growth stage was injured 14% more than V4 soybean 3 DAT, regardless of metribuzin rate. Injury to V2 and V4 soybean was similar 14 DAT, with injury of 21% to 40% across rates. Soybean injury when treated at the V2 and V4 growth stages was 6% to 29% 42 DAT compared to unifoliate soybean at 0 to 17%. Soybean yields in the metribuzin study yields were 96% to 98% of the nontreated. However, a 2% to 4% reduction equates to a loss of 90 to 180 kg ha−1 and a revenue loss of 32 to 65 US$ ha−1. Unifoliate and V2 soybean are more sensitive to a low dose of flumioxazin POST, and V2 and V4 soybean are more sensitive to a low dose of metribuzin POST. Injury and the impact on soybean growth could potentially cause economic loss for a soybean producer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2018. 

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Footnotes

Cite this article: Stephenson DO, Spivey TA, Deliberto MA, Blouin DC, Woolam BC, Buck TB (2018) Effects of low-dose flumioxazin and metribuzin postemergence applications on soybean. Weed Technol 33:87–94. doi: 10.1017/wet.2018.101

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