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Benchmark Study: I. Introduction, Weed Population, and Management Trends from the Benchmark Survey 2010

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Joby M. Prince
Affiliation:
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
David R. Shaw*
Affiliation:
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
Wade A. Givens
Affiliation:
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762
Micheal D. K. Owen
Affiliation:
Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
Stephen C. Weller
Affiliation:
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Bryan G. Young
Affiliation:
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901
Robert G. Wilson
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Scotts Bluff, NE 69361
David L. Jordan
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695
*
Corresponding author's E-mail: dshaw@research.msstate.edu

Abstract

Almost 1,650 corn, cotton, and soybean growers in 22 states participated in a 2010 telephone survey to determine their attitudes with regard to which weed species were most problematic in glyphosate-resistant (GR) crop production systems for corn, cotton, and soybean. The survey is a follow-up to a previous 2005 to 2006 survey that utilized a smaller set of growers from fewer states. In general, growers continued to estimate weed populations as low and few challenges have been created following adoption of GR cropping systems. Pigweed and foxtail species were dominant overall, whereas other species were more commodity and state specific. Corn, cotton, and soybean growers cited velvetleaf, annual morningglory, and waterhemp, respectively, as predominant weeds. Growers in the South region were more likely to report pigweed and waterhemp (Amaranthus spp.), whereas growers in the East and West reported horseweed. When growers were asked with which GR weeds they had experienced personally, horseweed was reported in all regions, but growers in the South more frequently reported pigweed, whereas growers in the East and West regions more frequently reported waterhemp. Comparisons with the previous 2005 survey indicated that more growers believed they were experiencing GR weeds and were more aware of specific examples in their state. In particular, the Amaranthus complex was of greatest concern in continuously cropped soybean and cotton.

En 2010, casi 1,650 productores de maíz, algodón y soya en 22 estados participaron en una encuesta telefónica para determinar sus actitudes en referencia a qué tipo de malezas fueron las más problemáticas en los sistemas de producción de cultivos resistentes a glyphosate para maíz, algodón y soya resistentes a este herbicida. Esta encuesta es el seguimiento de otra realizada en 2005–2006, la cual utilizó un grupo menor de productores en y se realizó en menos estados. En general, los productores siguieron estimando las poblaciones de malezas como bajas y pocos retos han sido creados después de la adopción de sistemas de cultivos resistentes a glyphosate. En general, las especies de los géneros Amaranthus y Setaria fueron las dominantes, mientras otras especies fueron más específicas de acuerdo al cultivo o al estado. Los productores de maíz, algodón y soya mencionaron Abutilon theophrasti, especies anuales del género Ipomoea y Amaranthus tuberculatus, respectivamente, como malezas predominantes. Los productores en la región sur reportaron Amarantus spp. con mayor frecuencia, en tanto que los agricultores de las regiones este y oeste reportaron Conyza canadensis. Cuando se les preguntó a los agricultores con cuáles malezas resistentes a glyphosate habían tenido experiencia personalmente, Conyza canadensis se reportó en todas las regiones, pero los agricultores en el sur reportaron Amaranthus más frecuentemente, mientras los productores de las regiones este y oeste reportaron más frecuentemente A. tuberculatus. Las comparaciones con la encuesta previa de 2005 indicaron que más agricultores creyeron haber experimentado una mayor incidencia de malezas resistentes a glyphosate y sabían de más ejemplos específicos en su estado. Particularmente, el complejo Amaranthus fue una de las mayores preocupaciones en soya y algodón en cultivo continuo.

Type
Education/Extension
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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