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Returning to the scene of the trauma in PTSD treatment – why, how and when?

  • Hannah Murray (a1), Christopher Merritt (a2) and Nick Grey (a3)

Abstract

Returning to the scene of the trauma is often recommended as part of trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Many clinicians avoid site visits due to lack of confidence or practical constraints; however, recent research suggests this is a valuable part of treatment. This article summarizes a rationale for including the site visit as part of cognitive therapy for PTSD, as well as the main considerations about when to carry it out in treatment. A practical framework for planning and implementing site visits is described.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr H. Murray, Traumatic Stress Service, South-West London and St Georges NHS Trust, London, UK (email: hannah.murray@swlstg-tr.nhs.uk).

References

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the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1754-470X
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Returning to the scene of the trauma in PTSD treatment – why, how and when?

  • Hannah Murray (a1), Christopher Merritt (a2) and Nick Grey (a3)
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