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Voltage-gated calcium channel blockers for psychiatric disorders: genomic reappraisal

  • Paul J. Harrison (a1), Elizabeth M. Tunbridge (a2), Annette C. Dolphin (a3) and Jeremy Hall (a4)

Summary

We reappraise the psychiatric potential of calcium channel blockers (CCBs). First, voltage-gated calcium channels are risk genes for several disorders. Second, use of CCBs is associated with altered psychiatric risks and outcomes. Third, research shows there is an opportunity for brain-selective CCBs, which are better suited to psychiatric indications.

Declaration of interest

E.M.T. and P.J.H. hold an unrestricted educational grant from Johnson & Johnson to work on the molecular neurobiology of calcium channels.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence: Paul Harrison, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK. Email: paul.harrison@psych.ox.ac.uk

References

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Voltage-gated calcium channel blockers for psychiatric disorders: genomic reappraisal

  • Paul J. Harrison (a1), Elizabeth M. Tunbridge (a2), Annette C. Dolphin (a3) and Jeremy Hall (a4)
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