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Severe personality disorder — whose responsibility?

  • Richard Cawthra (a1) and Robert Gibb (a2)

Extract

Should personality disordered individuals receive treatment within today's mental health services? The debate often follows episodes of aggression towards staff or patients by personality disordered individuals receiving treatment in hospital, and more recently where the general public have been affected. The subjects of personality disorder and psychopathy in particular have long evoked strong emotions which make clarity of thought difficult and psychiatry unclear of its position.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Richard Cawthra, Consultant Psychiatrist, Special Care and Rehabilitation Services, St Nicholas Hospital, Jubilee Road, Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne NE3 3XT

References

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Severe personality disorder — whose responsibility?

  • Richard Cawthra (a1) and Robert Gibb (a2)
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