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Recovery practice in community mental health teams: national survey

  • M. Leamy (a1), E. Clarke (a1), C. Le Boutillier (a1), V. Bird (a1), R. Choudhury (a2), R. MacPherson (a2), F. Pesola (a3), K. Sabas (a3), J. Williams (a3), P. Williams (a3) and M. Slade (a3)...

Abstract

Background

There is consensus about the importance of ‘recovery’ in mental health services, but the link between recovery orientation of mental health teams and personal recovery of individuals has been underresearched.

Aims

To investigate differences in team leader, clinician and service user perspectives of recovery orientation of community adult mental health teams in England.

Method

In six English mental health National Health Service (NHS) trusts, randomly chosen community adult mental health teams were surveyed. A random sample of ten patients, one team leader and a convenience sample of five clinicians were surveyed from each team. All respondents rated the recovery orientation of their team using parallel versions of the Recovery Self Assessment (RSA). In addition, service users also rated their own personal recovery using the Questionnaire about Processes of Recovery (QPR).

Results

Team leaders (n = 22) rated recovery orientation higher than clinicians (n = 109) or patients (n = 120) (Wald(2) = 7.0, P = 0.03), and both NHS trust and team type influenced RSA ratings. Patient-rated recovery orientation was a predictor of personal recovery (b = 0.58, 95% CI 0.31–0.85, P<0.001). Team leaders and clinicians with experience of mental illness (39%) or supporting a family member or friend with mental illness (76%) did not differ in their RSA ratings from other team leaders or clinicians.

Conclusions

Compared with team leaders, frontline clinicians and service users have less positive views on recovery orientation. Increasing recovery orientation may support personal recovery.

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Copyright

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.

Corresponding author

Mary Leamy, King's College London, National Nursing Research Unit, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, James Clerk Maxwell Building, 57 Waterloo Road, London SE1 8WA, UK. Email: mary.leamy@kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Recovery practice in community mental health teams: national survey

  • M. Leamy (a1), E. Clarke (a1), C. Le Boutillier (a1), V. Bird (a1), R. Choudhury (a2), R. MacPherson (a2), F. Pesola (a3), K. Sabas (a3), J. Williams (a3), P. Williams (a3) and M. Slade (a3)...
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