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Participant views on involvement in a trial of social recovery cognitive–behavioural therapy

  • Caitlin Notley (a1), Rose Christopher (a2), Joanne Hodgekins (a2), Rory Byrne (a3), Paul French (a4) and David Fowler (a5)...

Abstract

Background

The PRODIGY trial (Prevention of long term social disability amongst young people with emerging psychological difficulties, ISRCTN47998710) is a pilot trial of social recovery cognitive–behavioural therapy (SRCBT).

Aims

The PRODIGY qualitative substudy aimed to (a) explore individual experiences of participating in the pilot randomised, controlled trial (recruitment, randomisation, assessment) and initial views of therapy, and (b) to explore perceived benefits of taking part in research v. ethical concerns and potential risks.

Method

Qualitative investigation using semi-structured interviews with thematic analysis.

Results

Analysis revealed participant experiences around the key themes of acceptability, disclosure, practicalities, altruism and engagement.

Conclusions

Participants in both trial arms perceived themselves as gaining benefits from being involved in the study, above and beyond the intervention. This has implications for the design of future research and services for this client group, highlighting the importance of being flexible and an individualised approach as key engagement tools.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Caitlin Notley, Norwich Medical School, Norwich Research Park, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK. Email: c.notley@uea.ac.uk

Footnotes

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This study was funded by NIHR Health Technology Assessment grant: 10/104/51 PRODIGY Trial: ISRCTN47998710 (UKCRN trial registration number: 13341). This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Participant views on involvement in a trial of social recovery cognitive–behavioural therapy

  • Caitlin Notley (a1), Rose Christopher (a2), Joanne Hodgekins (a2), Rory Byrne (a3), Paul French (a4) and David Fowler (a5)...
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