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One-day cognitive–behavioural therapy self-confidence workshops for people with depression: randomised controlled trial

  • Linda Horrell (a1), Kimberley A. Goldsmith (a2), André T. Tylee (a3), Ulrike H. Schmidt (a4), Caroline L. Murphy (a5), Eva-Maria Bonin (a6), Jennifer Beecham (a7), Joanna Kelly (a8), Shriti Raikundalia (a9) and June S. L Brown (a10)...

Abstract

Background

Despite its high prevalence, help-seeking for depression is low.

Aims

To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 1-day cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) self-confidence workshops in reducing depression. Anxiety, self-esteem, prognostic indicators as well as access were also assessed.

Method

An open randomised controlled trial (RCT) waiting list control design with 12-week follow-up was used (trial registration: ISRCTN26634837). A total of 459 adult participants with depression (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of 14) self-referred and 382 participants (83%) were followed up.

Results

At follow-up, experimental and control participants differed significantly on the BDI, with an effect size of 0.55. Anxiety and self-esteem also differed. Of those who participated, 25% were GP non-consulters and 32% were from Black and minority ethnic groups. Women benefited more than men on depression scores. The intervention has a 90% chance of being considered cost-effective if a depression-free day is valued at £14.

Conclusions

Self-confidence workshops appear promising in terms of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and access by difficult-to-engage groups.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

June S. L. Brown, Psychology Department (PO77), Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: june.brown@kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Joint first authors.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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One-day cognitive–behavioural therapy self-confidence workshops for people with depression: randomised controlled trial

  • Linda Horrell (a1), Kimberley A. Goldsmith (a2), André T. Tylee (a3), Ulrike H. Schmidt (a4), Caroline L. Murphy (a5), Eva-Maria Bonin (a6), Jennifer Beecham (a7), Joanna Kelly (a8), Shriti Raikundalia (a9) and June S. L Brown (a10)...
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