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Late-life depression and mortality: influence of gender and antidepressant use

  • Joanne Ryan (a1), Isabelle Carriere (a1), Karen Ritchie (a1), Robert Stewart (a2), Gwladys Toulemonde (a3), Jean-François Dartigues (a4), Christophe Tzourio (a5) and Marie-Laure Ancelin (a6)...

Abstract

Background

Depression may increase the risk of mortality among certain subgroups of older people, but the part played by antidepressants in this association has not been thoroughly explored.

Aims

To identify the characteristics of older populations who are most at risk of dying, as a function of depressive symptoms, gender and antidepressant use.

Method

Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association between depression and/or antidepressant use and 4-year survival of 7363 community-dwelling elderly people. Major depressive disorder was evaluated using a standardised psychiatric examination based on DSM-IV criteria and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale.

Results

Depressed men using antidepressants had the greatest risk of dying, with increasing depression severity corresponding to a higher hazard risk. Among women, only severe depression in the absence of treatment was significantly associated with mortality.

Conclusions

The association between depression and mortality is gender-dependent and varies according to symptom load and antidepressant use.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Marie-Laure Ancelin, INSERM U888, Nervous System Pathologies, Hôpital La Colombière, P42, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, France. Email: ancelin@montp.inserm.fr

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Late-life depression and mortality: influence of gender and antidepressant use

  • Joanne Ryan (a1), Isabelle Carriere (a1), Karen Ritchie (a1), Robert Stewart (a2), Gwladys Toulemonde (a3), Jean-François Dartigues (a4), Christophe Tzourio (a5) and Marie-Laure Ancelin (a6)...

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Late-life depression and mortality: influence of gender and antidepressant use

  • Joanne Ryan (a1), Isabelle Carriere (a1), Karen Ritchie (a1), Robert Stewart (a2), Gwladys Toulemonde (a3), Jean-François Dartigues (a4), Christophe Tzourio (a5) and Marie-Laure Ancelin (a6)...
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