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Insight in psychosis: influence of cognitive ability and self-esteem

  • Michael A. Cooke (a1), Emmanuelle R. Peters (a1), Kathryn E. Greenwood (a1), Peter L. Fisher (a2), Veena Kumari (a3) and Elizabeth Kuipers (a3)...

Abstract

Background

Insight in psychosis has previously been associated with both depression and cognitive ability. Some studies have found a curvilinear relationship between insight and cognitive ability but the roles of self-esteem and depression have not been taken into account.

Aims

To investigate the relationships between insight and IQ, depression, and self-esteem.

Method

Correlations between self-reported and observer-rated insight, and measures of IQ, depression and self-esteem were examined in 67 people with psychosis.

Results

Better self-reported insight was associated with higher IQ and poorer self-esteem, but not depression. There was some evidence for a curvilinear relationship between IQ and self-reported insight, specifically the ‘awareness of illness' dimension, which survived correction for symptom variables.

Conclusions

The relationship between insight and IQ might reflect both the basis of insight in intellectual ability and the influence of a psychological mechanism that preserves self-esteem.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Emmanuelle Peters, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry Department of Psychology (PO77), 16 De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK. Email: e.peters@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Insight in psychosis: influence of cognitive ability and self-esteem

  • Michael A. Cooke (a1), Emmanuelle R. Peters (a1), Kathryn E. Greenwood (a1), Peter L. Fisher (a2), Veena Kumari (a3) and Elizabeth Kuipers (a3)...
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