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Genetic variation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder: Case-control study of over 3000 individuals from the UK

  • Elaine K. Green (a1), Rachel Raybould (a2), Stuart Macgregor (a3), Sally Hyde (a4), Allan H. Young (a5), Michael C. O'Donovan (a5), Michael J. Owen (a5), George Kirov (a5), Lisa Jones (a3), Ian Jones (a6) and Nick Craddock (a6)...

Abstract

Background

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) influences neuronal survival, proliferation and plasticity Three family-based studies have shown association of the common Valine (Val) allele of the Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene with susceptibility to bipolar disorder.

Aims

To replicate this finding.

Method

We genotyped the Val66Met polymorphism in our UK White bipolar case-control sample (n=3062).

Results

We found no overall evidence of allele or genotype association. However, we found association with disease status in the subset of 131 individuals that had experienced rapid cycling at some time (P=0.004). We found a similar association on re-analysis of our previously reported family-based association sample (P<0.03, one-tailed test).

Conclusions

Variation at the Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF does not play a major role in influencing susceptibility to bipolar disorder as a whole, but is associated with susceptibility to the rapid-cycling subset of the disorder.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor Nick Craddock, Department of Psychological Medicine, Henry Wellcome Building, Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF4 4XN, UK. Tel: +44 (0)2920 744663; fax: +44(0)2920 746554; e-mail: craddockn@cardiff.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

N.C. and M.J.O. are consultants to Glaxo Smith Kline and have received grant funding and honoraria from Glaxo Smith Kline, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly. M.C.O'D., A.H.Y., L.J. and G.K. have received honoraria from Glaxo Smith Kline, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly. G.K. has received grant funding from Janssen. Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Genetic variation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in bipolar disorder: Case-control study of over 3000 individuals from the UK

  • Elaine K. Green (a1), Rachel Raybould (a2), Stuart Macgregor (a3), Sally Hyde (a4), Allan H. Young (a5), Michael C. O'Donovan (a5), Michael J. Owen (a5), George Kirov (a5), Lisa Jones (a3), Ian Jones (a6) and Nick Craddock (a6)...
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