Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study

  • Naoko Shirao (a1), Yasumasa Okamoto (a1), Tomoyuki Mantani (a1), Yuri Okamoto (a2) and Shigeto Yamawaki (a3)...

Abstract

Background

We have previously reported that the temporomesial area, including the amygdala, is activated in women when processing unpleasant words concerning body image.

Aims

To detect gender differences in brain activation during processing of these words.

Method

Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate 13 men and 13 women during an emotional decision task consisting of unpleasant words concerning body image and neutral words.

Results

The left medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were activated only among men, and the left amygdala was activated only among women during the task; activation in the apical prefrontal region was significantly greater in men than in women.

Conclusions

Our data suggest that the prefrontal region is responsible for the gender differences in the processing of words concerning body image, and may also be responsible for gender differences in susceptibility to eating disorders.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Shigeto Yamawaki, Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Programs for Biomedical Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan. Tel: +81 82 257 5207; fax: +81 82 257 5209; e-mail: yamawaki@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

Footnotes

Hide All

Declaration of interest

None. Funding detailed in Acknowledgement.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Adolphs, R. (1999) Social cognition and the human brain. Trends in Cognitive Science, 3, 469479.
American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn) (DSM-IV). Washington, DC: APA.
Drevets, W. C. & Raichle, M. E. (1998) Reciprocal suppression of regional cerebral blood flow during emotional versus higher cognitive process: implications for interaction between cognition and emotion. Cognition and Emotion, 12, 353385.
Elliott, R., Friston, K. J. & Dolan, R. J. (2000) Dissociable neural responses in human reward systems. Journal of Neuroscience, 20, 61596165.
Friston, K. J., Holmes, A. P. & Worsley, K. J. (1999) How many subjects constitute a study? Neuroimage, 10, 15.
Garner, D. M. (1991) Eating Disorder Inventory – 2 (EDI–2). Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.
Halgren, E., Walter, R. D., Cherlow, D. G., et al (1978) Mental phenomena evoked by electrical stimulation of the human hippocampal formation and amygdala. Brain, 101, 83117.
Hall, G. B., Witelson, S. F., Szechtman, H., et al (2004) Sex differences in functional activation patterns revealed by increased emotion processing demands. Neuroreport, 15, 219223.
Isenberg, N., Silbersweig, D., Engelien, A., et al (1999) Linguistic threat activates the human amygdala. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA, 96, 1045610459.
Johnson, S. C., Baxter, L. C., Wilder, L. S., et al (2002) Neural correlates of self–reflection. Brain, 125, 18081814.
Lancaster, J. L., Woldorff, M. G., Parsons, L. M., et al (2000) Automated Talairach atlas labels for functional brain mapping. Human Brain Mapping, 10, 120131.
Lane, R. D., Reiman, E. M., Bradley, M. M., et al (1997) Neuroanatomical correlates of pleasant and unpleasant emotion. Neuropsychologia, 35, 14371444.
McClure, E. B., Monk, C. S., Nelson, E. E., et al (2004) A developmental examination of gender differences in brain engagement during evaluation of threat. Biological Psychiatry, 55, 10471055.
Morris, J. S., Ohman, A. & Dolan, R. J. (1998) Conscious and unconscious emotional learning in the human amygdala. Nature, 393, 467470.
Oldfield, R. C. (1971) The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh inventory. Neuropsychologia, 9, 97113.
Reiman, E. M., Lane, R. D., Ahern, G. L., et al (1997) Neuroanatomical correlates of externally and internally generated human emotion. American Journal of Psychiatry, 154, 918925.
Scott, S. K., Young, A. W., Calder, A. J., et al (1997) Impaired auditory recognition of fear and anger following bilateral amygdala lesions. Nature, 385, 254257.
Seeger, G., Braus, D. F., Ruf, M., et al (2002) Body image distortion reveals amygdala activation in patients with anorexia nervosa – a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Neuroscience Letters, 326, 2528.
Shirao, N., Okamoto, Y., Okada, G., et al (2003a) Temporomesial activation in young females associated with unpleasant words concerning body image. Neuropsychobiology, 48, 136142.
Shirao, N., Okamoto, Y., Okamoto, Y., et al (2003b) Ratings of negative body image words, negative emotion words and neutral words by eating disorder patients and healthy subjects. Brain Sciences and Mental Disorders, 15, 141147.
Tabert, M. H., Borod, J. C., Tang, C. Y., et al (2001) Differential amygdala activation during emotional decision and recognition memory tasks using unpleasant words: an fMRI study. Neuropsychologia, 39, 556573.
Talairach, J. & Tournoux, P. (1988) Co-planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain. Stuttgart: Thieme.
Toglia, M. P. & Battig, W. F. (1978) Handbook of Semantic Word Norms. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Wagner, A., Ruf, M., Braus, D. F., et al (2003) Neuronal activity changes and body image distortion in anorexia nervosa. Neuroreport, 14, 21932197.
Weissman, M. M. & Olfson, M. (1995) Depression in women: implications for health care research. Science, 269, 799801.
Zysset, S., Huber, O., Ferstl, E., et al (2002) The anterior frontomedian cortex and evaluative judgment: an fMRI study. Neuroimage, 15, 983991.

Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study

  • Naoko Shirao (a1), Yasumasa Okamoto (a1), Tomoyuki Mantani (a1), Yuri Okamoto (a2) and Shigeto Yamawaki (a3)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

Gender differences in brain activity generated by unpleasant word stimuli concerning body image: an fMRI study

  • Naoko Shirao (a1), Yasumasa Okamoto (a1), Tomoyuki Mantani (a1), Yuri Okamoto (a2) and Shigeto Yamawaki (a3)...
Submit a response

eLetters

We encountered an error trying to retrieve eLetters for this article. Please try again or contact Customer Services

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *