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        Communication skills training for psychiatrists
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        Communication skills training for psychiatrists
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It is encouraging to see studies emerge regarding communication skills training for psychiatrists. 1 Although the authors claim that this is the first study to test an intervention for psychiatrists to enhance communication with patients with psychosis, we would like to draw readers' attention to other work that has been published in this area. In Australia, since 2013, an advanced communication skills training programme for postgraduate psychiatry trainees (ComPsych) has been part of psychiatry trainees' formal postgraduate education. 2 This focuses on improving doctor–patient communication about schizophrenia diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Two pilot studies have been published about this programme: evaluating trainees' attitudes and self-efficacy regarding the programme and their confidence in their own communication skills; 3 and an objective evaluation of their skills using standardised patient assessments. 4 It is our hope to continue this important work, and we are encouraged to also see the work done by the authors of this paper.

1 McCabe, R, John, P, Dooley, J, Healey, P, Cushing, A, Kingdon, D, et al. Training to enhance psychiatrist communication with patients with psychosis (TEMPO): cluster randomised controlled trial. Br J Psychiatry 2016; 209: 517–24.
2 Ditton-Phare, P, Halpin, S, Sandhu, H, Kelly, B, Vamos, M, Outram, S, et al. Communication skills in psychiatry training. Australas Psychiatry 2015; 23: 429–31.
3 Loughland, C, Kelly, B, Ditton-Phare, P, Sandhu, H, Vamos, M, Outram, S, et al. Improving clinician competency in communication about schizophrenia: a pilot educational program for psychiatry trainees. Acad Psychiatry 2015; 39: 160–4.
4 Ditton-Phare, P, Sandhu, H, Kelly, B, Kissane, D, Loughland, C. Pilot evaluation of a communication skills training program for psychiatry residents using standardized patient assessment. Acad Psychiatry 2016; 40: 768–75.