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Cognitive–behavioural therapy for severe and recurrent bipolar disorders: Randomised controlled trial

  • Jan Scott (a1), Eugene Paykel (a2), Richard Morriss (a3), Richard Bentall (a4), Peter Kinderman (a5), Tony Johnson (a6), Rosemary Abbott (a7) and Hazel Hayhurst (a7)...

Abstract

Background

Efficacy trials suggest that structured psychological therapies may significantly reduce recurrence rates of major mood episodes in individuals with bipolar disorders.

Aims

To compare the effectiveness of treatment as usual with an additional 22 sessions of cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT).

Method

We undertook a multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled treatment trial (n=253). Patients were assessed every 8 weeks for 18 months.

Results

More than half of the patients had a recurrence by 18 months, with no significant differences between groups (hazard ratio=1.05; 95% CI 0.74–1.50). Post hoc analysis demonstrated a significant interaction (P=0.04) such that adjunctive CBT was significantly more effective than treatment as usual in those with fewer than 12 previous episodes, but less effective in those with more episodes.

Conclusions

People with bipolar disorder and comparatively fewer previous mood episodes may benefit from CBT. However, such cases form the minority of those receiving mental healthcare.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Professor Jan Scott, Department of Psychological Medicine, PO Box 96, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: j.scott@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Footnotes

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See pp. 321–322, this issue.

On behalf of the members of the Multicentre Trial of Cognitive–Behavioural Therapy for Bipolar Disorders (MCTBP) research team.

Declaration of interest

None. Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Cognitive–behavioural therapy for severe and recurrent bipolar disorders: Randomised controlled trial

  • Jan Scott (a1), Eugene Paykel (a2), Richard Morriss (a3), Richard Bentall (a4), Peter Kinderman (a5), Tony Johnson (a6), Rosemary Abbott (a7) and Hazel Hayhurst (a7)...
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