Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Authors' reply
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

It is correct that some patients with psychotic depression in the studies by Bruijn et al (1996) and van den Broek et al (2004) were given haloperidol as adjunctive treatment. However, as mentioned in our article, in our intention-to-treat analysis we counted these patients as having dropped out. So, additional treatment with haloperidol did not affect the validity of our findings regarding patients receiving antidepressant monotherapy.

We agree, as mentioned in our article, that the quality of the constituent studies and the small sample sizes does influence the outcome of our meta-analysis regarding the comparison of antidepressant monotherapy v. the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic. But to say that these data favour the combination is statistically not true and surely is no sound basis for contemporary clinical practice to use the combination. Moreover, the data indicate that there is no evidence for the clinical belief that an antidepressant alone is ineffective. Thus, we maintain our conclusion that both antidepressant monotherapy and the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic are appropriate options for patients with psychotic depression.